Dell-Compatible Video Cards

March 4, 2009 at 14:00:18
Specs: XP, 2.4/256
I have an opportunity to choose from a variety of used 3D accelerator cards (PCI or AGP) for my Dell but I don't know which ones are compatible. These cards cost in the range of $25-$50 dollars versus $100-$500 for new ones. How can I determine which ones are compatible?

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#1
March 4, 2009 at 14:24:36
The first thing to do is determine what slots are available. The manual for the computer should tell you that. Then you still need to determine if you can use a full height card. I am not sure about Dell but some HP cases are what is called slimline. There isn't enough room for a standard card.

as far a determining what each used card actually is, you can Google the model number and get all the information from that.

Go to the Dell site if you don't have a manual and enter the service tag number to determine how your computer came from the factory.

Are the used cards all labeled with model numbers?


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#2
March 4, 2009 at 14:27:30
Generally, if the card is compatible with your OS, it will work fine, regardless of the computer itself. Some computers, however, aren't compatible with 1 or 2 cards. So the real question is, what cards AREN'T compatible.

What model of Dimension is it?

-Trent

"If at first you don't succeed, skydiving may not be for you."

-Our tour guide at Fenway Park in Boston, MA.


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#3
March 4, 2009 at 18:46:23
"Generally, if the card is compatible with your OS, it will work fine, regardless of the computer itself."???

larry


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Related Solutions

#4
March 5, 2009 at 11:07:21
Sorry, I forgot about slots, card height, etc. I haven't been myself lately. ;)

"If at first you don't succeed, skydiving may not be for you."

-Our tour guide at Fenway Park in Boston, MA.


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#5
March 6, 2009 at 05:01:51
My original question comes from the fact that (1), the AGP slot in the Dell Dimension 4600 is somewhat unique due to its size and the location of the divider notch, That is, not all AGP cards will even fit into it. And (2) I will not have the computer with me when I go to examine the AGP cards at the dealer's shop. I will have to rely on the dealer's word that the card(s) I buy will both fit and work with XP. Maybe he will actually have a Dimension in house that we can try for a proper fit. Anyway, thanx for all the good info.

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#6
March 6, 2009 at 05:17:56
Look at the link below to see all the flavors of AGP and diagrams of the notch placements. That should help you to determine what version of AGP you have.

Without taking into consideration the pro stuff there are basically 4 versions of AGP. They are classified by the suffix atached to them. That suffix indicates the speed capability of the slot.

AGP 1x, 2x, 4x, 8x.

You can pretty much discard the first two if your motherboard has on board video. That leaves you with AGP 4x or 8x. MOST AGP cards and slots are backward compatible one version. So an 8x card will usually work in a 4x slot and will run at 4x. There are exceptions. I suggest you try to get a list of the available cards and research.

What is the deal anyway? Are you currently using on board video and want to improve? You may be able to buy new for the money you mention.

Below is a link to all the AGP 4x/8x cards available on their site now.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#7
March 8, 2009 at 12:18:59
Yes, the on-board video does not support some of the video games my customer wants to play. This is a charity case and I'm trying to keep the costs down. The site you provided, by the way, seems to have some very good deals, which I will take advantage of in the future. Thanx.

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