Solved dell sx270 connect to dvi tv

March 11, 2012 at 16:47:21
Specs: Windows 2000 SP4, Intel Celeron 2.0 ghz 522mb

I have a Dell SX270 with a dvi video connection. I have a RCA Scenium HDTV with a DVI-D connection for input. I want to connect the two in order to show Powerpoint. I got a DVI-D cable which connects the two, but there is no display on the TV when I switch to that input. I only get a "Unusable Signal" message which is normal if nothing is connected. The SX270 only has the one video port. Without some short of display I have no way to know what the PC is doing. How do I get these two to play nicely together?

See More: dell sx270 connect to dvi tv

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✔ Best Answer
March 12, 2012 at 12:23:19

"I will check on updated video drivers."

No software on the hard drive is required in order for your computer to produce video while booting BEFORE the operating system loads from the hard drive !

You CAN have the situation where you DO have video while booting BEFORE the operating stem loads but NO video in the operating system.
(See the info about that in last part of this post)

"I don't have the Scenium documentation ...."

We just need the model number. It's probably on a sticker on the back of the TV
.....

"How/where can I go to find out which I have and whether it will work or not? "

Digital Visual Interface (DVI)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digita...

See Connectors

All video cards, and most mboard onboard video adapters, have what LOOKS LIKE the the DVI-I (dual link) port.

Some newer mboards have an onboard video adapter that LOOKS LIKE a DVI-D (dual link) port - you cannot get analog video from it by using a standard DVI to VGA gender adapter.

(LOOKS LIKE a dual link port = the port may be wired up as a single link port)

Either type of DVI-D connector PLUG on a video cable will plug into the DVI-I (dual link) port physically, but a video cable with the DVI-D (single link) connector PLUG MAY NOT produce video - a DVD-D (dual link) connector PLUG WILL.

DVI compatibility for sticklers
http://www.playtool.com/pages/dvico...

(scroll down to below the second set of DVI connector pictures)

"Dual link DVI cables are usually called "DL-DVI" for short. The image above shows the various single and dual link DVI cables. The single link cables are missing the six pins used by the second link.
There's no such thing as a single link video card or monitor connector. Connectors always have the full three rows of eight holes whether they're single link or dual link hardware. So you can't tell whether a video card or monitor is single link or dual link by looking at the connector.
You have to check the video card or monitor specifications to know how many links are supported. Both single link and dual link cables fit into both single and dual link video cards and monitors. So single link cables fit into dual link video cards and monitors and dual link cables fit into single link video cards and monitors.

The compatibility rule between single and dual link DVI hardware is simple: if the video card, DVI cable, and monitor all support dual link then the setup as a whole supports both single link and dual link screen modes. If one or more of the video card, cable, and monitor support only single link then the setup supports only single link screen modes.

DVI-D cables fit into both DVI-D and DVI-I connectors whereas DVI-I cables do not fit into DVI-D connectors. And a dual link cable will function just fine in a single link setup as described above. As a result, the most useful kind of digital DVI cable is a dual link DVI-D cable. People rarely use the analog lines in a DVI-I cable so there's not much point in getting one of those. Dual link DVI-D cables are the "universal" digital cable."

"Meanwhile the DVI-D cable I have is a 6 ft TV DVI-D M to M Digital Dual Link cable, if that helps any."

If it truly is a DVI-D (dual link) cable then it should work fine.

See the pictures of the DVD-D (dual link) ports. If your cable has pins in ALL the same positions, then the cable should work fine.
....

If you DO have the situation where you DO have video while booting BEFORE the operating system loads but NO video in the operating system, that's easy to fix.

NOTE that the following procedure must be modified such that you ALSO set the resolution to the one (or one of the ones) that the TV supports in DVI (PC) mode or similar. (if you don't know that, that's one of the reasons we need to know the model of your TV). If it's an LCD, LED LCD, or Plasma TV , there is only ONE "native" or "optimal" resolution that yields you the clearest display on the TV - other resolutions will NOT look as clear, or may not display at all, when you load Windows normally.

For 2000 or XP...
See response 9 here:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

starting at....
Boot into Enable VGA mode.

Note - that's missing this...

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs you have in drives.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, starting very early in the boot.
When the Windows "Advanced..." menu appears, choose Enable VGA mode.
.......

For Vista, or Windows 7....
See response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
....

If you DO have an LCD, LED LCD, or Plasma TV , if you can't select the "native" or "optimal" resolution in Windows, you could try updating the video drivers to the latest ones, but it's unlikely updating the video drivers will help regarding that situation.

If you STILL can't select the "native" or "optimal" resolution in Windows, choose a resolution that has the same aspect ratio as the "native" or "optimal" resolution, if you can.
Aspect ratio = the ratio of the resolution's width to it's height, in whole numbers, e.g. 16:9, or 1.777 to 1 when you divide the first number in the resolution by the second number.
Then turn on Clear Type (I don't know if you can do this in 2000).

Turn on Clear Type in Windows - makes type/fonts on LCD screens look clearer.

http://www.microsoft.com/typography...




#1
March 11, 2012 at 19:34:31

Buy a video card.

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#2
March 12, 2012 at 04:59:56

Hi Riider,

please could you expand on your above reply.

e.g. what is the purpose of the dvi video connection (which is supposed to be for digital flat panels) already on the SX270.

Thanks - Mike


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#3
March 12, 2012 at 05:54:31

Your system is old & the integrated Intel extreme 2 graphics built into the motherboard suck. Make sure you have the latest drivers installed:

http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det...

And make sure you have the screen resolution set correctly. You didn't state the model/model number of your TV, but it has a "native resolution", that is what the screen resolution should be set to. It's very possible that the Intel "not so" extreme graphics doesn't support widescreen resolutions but regardless of the resolution setting, you should see the Dell splash screen at bootup. If you're not seeing the splash screen, you either have a hardware problem, the BIOS settings are wrong, or a setting on the TV is wrong.

Here's your system specs. From what I can tell, the motherboard has NO expansion slots. That means you can't upgrade the graphics so you're stuck with what you have:

http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

http://www.pcmadd.com/specificatii/...


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Related Solutions

#4
March 12, 2012 at 08:25:47

"I have a RCA Scenium HDTV..."

Which model ?

Your TV may have a DVI-D video input port (digital video only), or a DVI-I video input port (both digital and analog video)

Your Dell SX270 has DVI-I video output (both digital and analog video)

There are several different types of DVI-D cables.
If you use the wrong type you'll get no video at all.


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#5
March 12, 2012 at 09:07:16

"RCA Scenium HDTV"

Somehow I missed that, but we still need the model number.


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#6
March 12, 2012 at 10:30:09

Thanks for all you help on this. You are right that the SX270 has no room for expansion slots. I will check on updated video drivers.The Scenium TV has a Dvi-D Input port. If there are multiple Dvi-D Cables. How/where can I go to find out which I have and whether it will work or not?

Thanks Again


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#7
March 12, 2012 at 11:23:13

I don't have the Scenium documentation with me, but what I read said that it had a DVI-D connection. I thought their infor for connecting to my PC was pretty sketchy. I will get the stuff on it and find the model number. Meanwhile the DVI-D cable I have is a 6 ft TV DVI-D M to M Digital Dual Link cable, if that helps any.

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#8
March 12, 2012 at 12:23:19
✔ Best Answer

"I will check on updated video drivers."

No software on the hard drive is required in order for your computer to produce video while booting BEFORE the operating system loads from the hard drive !

You CAN have the situation where you DO have video while booting BEFORE the operating stem loads but NO video in the operating system.
(See the info about that in last part of this post)

"I don't have the Scenium documentation ...."

We just need the model number. It's probably on a sticker on the back of the TV
.....

"How/where can I go to find out which I have and whether it will work or not? "

Digital Visual Interface (DVI)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digita...

See Connectors

All video cards, and most mboard onboard video adapters, have what LOOKS LIKE the the DVI-I (dual link) port.

Some newer mboards have an onboard video adapter that LOOKS LIKE a DVI-D (dual link) port - you cannot get analog video from it by using a standard DVI to VGA gender adapter.

(LOOKS LIKE a dual link port = the port may be wired up as a single link port)

Either type of DVI-D connector PLUG on a video cable will plug into the DVI-I (dual link) port physically, but a video cable with the DVI-D (single link) connector PLUG MAY NOT produce video - a DVD-D (dual link) connector PLUG WILL.

DVI compatibility for sticklers
http://www.playtool.com/pages/dvico...

(scroll down to below the second set of DVI connector pictures)

"Dual link DVI cables are usually called "DL-DVI" for short. The image above shows the various single and dual link DVI cables. The single link cables are missing the six pins used by the second link.
There's no such thing as a single link video card or monitor connector. Connectors always have the full three rows of eight holes whether they're single link or dual link hardware. So you can't tell whether a video card or monitor is single link or dual link by looking at the connector.
You have to check the video card or monitor specifications to know how many links are supported. Both single link and dual link cables fit into both single and dual link video cards and monitors. So single link cables fit into dual link video cards and monitors and dual link cables fit into single link video cards and monitors.

The compatibility rule between single and dual link DVI hardware is simple: if the video card, DVI cable, and monitor all support dual link then the setup as a whole supports both single link and dual link screen modes. If one or more of the video card, cable, and monitor support only single link then the setup supports only single link screen modes.

DVI-D cables fit into both DVI-D and DVI-I connectors whereas DVI-I cables do not fit into DVI-D connectors. And a dual link cable will function just fine in a single link setup as described above. As a result, the most useful kind of digital DVI cable is a dual link DVI-D cable. People rarely use the analog lines in a DVI-I cable so there's not much point in getting one of those. Dual link DVI-D cables are the "universal" digital cable."

"Meanwhile the DVI-D cable I have is a 6 ft TV DVI-D M to M Digital Dual Link cable, if that helps any."

If it truly is a DVI-D (dual link) cable then it should work fine.

See the pictures of the DVD-D (dual link) ports. If your cable has pins in ALL the same positions, then the cable should work fine.
....

If you DO have the situation where you DO have video while booting BEFORE the operating system loads but NO video in the operating system, that's easy to fix.

NOTE that the following procedure must be modified such that you ALSO set the resolution to the one (or one of the ones) that the TV supports in DVI (PC) mode or similar. (if you don't know that, that's one of the reasons we need to know the model of your TV). If it's an LCD, LED LCD, or Plasma TV , there is only ONE "native" or "optimal" resolution that yields you the clearest display on the TV - other resolutions will NOT look as clear, or may not display at all, when you load Windows normally.

For 2000 or XP...
See response 9 here:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

starting at....
Boot into Enable VGA mode.

Note - that's missing this...

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs you have in drives.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, starting very early in the boot.
When the Windows "Advanced..." menu appears, choose Enable VGA mode.
.......

For Vista, or Windows 7....
See response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
....

If you DO have an LCD, LED LCD, or Plasma TV , if you can't select the "native" or "optimal" resolution in Windows, you could try updating the video drivers to the latest ones, but it's unlikely updating the video drivers will help regarding that situation.

If you STILL can't select the "native" or "optimal" resolution in Windows, choose a resolution that has the same aspect ratio as the "native" or "optimal" resolution, if you can.
Aspect ratio = the ratio of the resolution's width to it's height, in whole numbers, e.g. 16:9, or 1.777 to 1 when you divide the first number in the resolution by the second number.
Then turn on Clear Type (I don't know if you can do this in 2000).

Turn on Clear Type in Windows - makes type/fonts on LCD screens look clearer.

http://www.microsoft.com/typography...



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#9
March 16, 2012 at 14:09:55

Hey Tubesandwires -- Your info has been very helpful. I have updated audio and video drivers. I tested my DVI-D cable by attaching a monitor which has a DVI-D connector as well as a vga connector. The DVI-D cable worked fine with the monitor once I switched it to digital. My RCA Scenium HDTV is a HDLP50W151. Since I was not getting any splash screen on startup, I am thinking my issue may be as easy as switching remote,not only to Input 5, but also from DVD or VCR to TV. Seems like it may just be a DUH! on my part, but I will know for sure on Monday.
OOps, I probably still need to know the resolution to set the PC at don't 1? It looks like the horizontal resolution is 1280 and the screen is 16:9, so would that mean the best setting would be 1280x600 even though that seems very narrow?

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#10
March 16, 2012 at 15:57:47

So you've confirmed the DVD-D cable works with a monitor. Are you SURE it's dual link cable ? Do the end connectors have all the pins for DVI-D dual link ? (see above)

Most computer monitors that have both a VGA and DVI port can only be connected from a video ouput source to one or the other port at a time, not both.
.....

The shorter answer....

You should ALWAYS get video while booting the computer BEFORE Windows loads, although you may NOT get video in Windows (which can be fixed).

If you get NO VIDEO while booting BEFORE Windows loads, when the TV remote's INPUT button is set to DVI, than it appears you cannot connect that way from your computer to your particular TV model and get a display.

However, you probably WILL get a display when you connect to three RCA jacks for HDTV, and set the remote's INPUT to the appropriate source.

E.g. Use something similar to this.

DVI-I to 3 RCA Component Cable - 6ft
http://www.amazon.com/DVI-I-RCA-Com...

"This cable connects DVI device to 3 RCA component RCA."

............

The details.....

RCA Scenium HDTV
(Model:) HDLP50W151

User's Guide (download source)
http://www.retrevo.com/support/RCA-...

I downloaded it.

I searched it - NO MENTION of PC or computer, or specific resolutions for either !
Not good things !

DVI-HDTV input - lets you connect a HD receiver with a HD output.

Huh ?

Page 12

Input Ports

DVI-HDTV

"The speed signal of the DVI connection is 1080i for HDTV at a rate of 1.78 Gigabits per second."

1080i = 1080 x something screen resolution, interlaced scan (1/2 the horzontal lines, the other half, alternating).
1080p = progressive scan, better.

Component Inputs - two sets of three HDTV RCA connections for video

Composite inputs - two sets of legacy composite (one RCA connection for video), or S-Video
(Connecting video output from a computer's "S-Video" port to the TV to either of those types of ports results in a relatively crappy looking display.)
...

Remote = Input button - select from VID1, VID2, FRNT, CMP1, CMP2, DVI

NO PC. or Computer (or abbreviation of it) .
Usually a TV desgned to be used as a computer monitor has a PC input selection.

.........

I have no idea what a DVI-HDTV port is.

The manual does not show the detail of the pins in the port when you zoom in.
.....

Searched the web with DVI-HDTV but didn't find much.

HDMI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDMI

The HDMI Founders began development on HDMI 1.0 on April 16, 2002, with the goal of creating an AV connector that was backward-compatible with DVI.[17][18][19] At the time, DVI-HDCP (DVI with HDCP) and DVI-HDTV (DVI-HDCP using the CEA-861-B video standard) were being used on HDTVs.[19][20][21] HDMI 1.0 was designed to improve on DVI-HDTV by using a smaller connector and adding support for audio, and enhanced support for YCbCr and consumer electronics control functions.

References

21 ^ Alen Koebel (2003-02). "DVI and HDMI: Digital A/V Interfaces for A New Age". Widescreen Review (69): 64. http://www.widescreenreview.com/. Retrieved 2008-06-24. "When HDCP is added to DVI, the result is often called "DVI+HDCP." When this is used on an HDTV, HD monitor or set-top box, a further standard is usually applied: IEA/CEA-861 (currently 861-B)...the interface is commonly known as DVI-HDTV."
.....

Digital Visual Interface
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digita...

Scroll down to Connectors to the last connector shown

Some new DVD players, TV sets (including HDTV sets) and video projectors have DVI/HDCP connectors; these are physically the same as DVI connectors but transmit an encrypted signal using the HDCP protocol for copy protection. Computers with DVI video connectors can use many DVI-equipped HDTV sets as a display, but only computers whose graphics systems support High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection are currently able to play content that requires digital rights management
..............

Your port isn't labelled DVI-HDCP so the latter probably doesn't apply.
.........

Review -
It's a rear projection DLP HDTV TV
http://reviews.cnet.com/projection-...


Specs
http://www.pcworld.com/product/2237...

Excerpts:

"Screen size and resolution 50-inch, 1280-by-720 pixel screen "

That's the only mention I've found of it's "native" or "optimal" resolution

"Digital input formats 480i, 480p, 1080i DVI input supported "
...............

You probably WILL get a display when you connect to three RCA jacks for HDTV, and set the remote's INPUT to the appropriate source.

Page 12 in the manual

Input Ports

Component Inputs - two sets of three HDTV RCA connections for video

E.g. Use something similar to this.

DVI-I to 3 RCA Component Cable - 6ft
http://www.amazon.com/DVI-I-RCA-Com...

"This cable connects DVI device to 3 RCA component RCA."


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#11
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#12
March 16, 2012 at 17:04:15

HDCP IS mentioned in it's User's Guide.

So you probably MUST use something like this, instead:

DVI-I to 3 RCA Component Cable - 6ft
http://www.amazon.com/DVI-I-RCA-Com...


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#13
March 16, 2012 at 17:10:23

The monitor I tried the cable with did only work with either one or the other cable. I thought it would be a way of seeing whether the cable was working or not.

Yes, I am sure it is a DVI-D Dual Link. It has all 24 pins and the single wide pin next to them and none of the pins around the wide pin. The PC has DVI-I with all 24 pins and wide pin plus the 4 small pins around it. Selenium has DVI-D connector. Manual also indicates it is DVI-D. You are right that it is sketchy about a PC. It shows PC connected with ethernet cable. It shows the DVI-D connector used for "HD set top box" and it supports "some digital signals.

My users guide doesn't mention the component/composite video inputs until pg21. On the back of the TV the DVI-D Video Input 5 is labeled DVI-HDTV and has L/R audio inputs with it.

I did not get a splash screen when I connected the DVI-D cable from my SX270 to the Selenium and booted, but I am hoping that is because the TV is normally set up for playing DVD's and I did not switch it to TV from DVD. I will try again on Sunday now that I am armed with a better understanding and working sound on the PC also. Thanks again, and I will let you know what does or doesn't show up.


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#14
March 16, 2012 at 17:22:55

There is NO mention of DVI-D in the User's Guide I found.

As I found above....

"Some new DVD players, TV sets (including HDTV sets) and video projectors have DVI/HDCP connectors; these are physically the same as DVI connectors but transmit an encrypted signal using the HDCP protocol for copy protection."


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#15
March 16, 2012 at 17:44:25

So, have they modified the users guide? Does the users guide you have show the DVI-D connector for Input 5? Here is a link to the one I have http://tv.manualsonline.com/manuals...

Page 18 gives an explanation of the DVI connection which is a bit more detailed.

You are thinking that I should not try to use the Input 5 DVI-D connection and use Input 3/4 instead with the cable you suggested which converts DVI-I to three audio/video plugs?


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#16
March 17, 2012 at 09:03:42

The manual download I found is 15903560Rev1.pdf

Your TV may be newer Revision of the same model,
OR, they had the WRONG User's Guide download.

There is no ethernet jack (wired network port) on the TV in the manual I found.

If your model has the ethernet jack, then I didn't find the correct manual.

In the manual you found...
Page 24 of pdf, 22 of manual - ethernet jack

If your TV has ALL of the connectors shown in the manual you found, then you have probably found the correct manual, and I didn't, initially.
....

Support for RCA TV models sold in the US
http://www.rca.com/tvsupport/tv_sup...

(If you bought it in Canada, the support info may be different.)

Selected

"I purchased my RCA TV between 2004 and April 2010"

Downloads - 50 inch - HDLP50W151

(NOTE that I know from previous experience that RCA doesn't always list support for earlier revisions or versions of the same model. )

User's Guide - 96 pages - appears to be the SAME as the one you found
http://support.ttetech.com/RCATV/As...
....

Update - I downloaded the manual you found by clicking on the floppy disk icon in the top bar of Adobe Acrobat Reader - it is NOT the same size as the second one I found - it's smaller.
The one I downloaded is
HDLP50W151_1614682A-1B_e-04.pdf

Maybe e-04 indicates it's for the 4th revision of the model ?
Is there a Revision number on your label ?
...........

Your / that manual DOES NOT show connecting the video port of a computer to the DVI-D port.

(Update - the quoted page numbers are the ones in the manual YOU found.)

Page 17 of pdf - 15 of manual

"A computer is only needed if you want to view photos or graphics on the TV that are stored on the computer"

Page 24 of pdf, 22 of manual - ethernet jack

You can connect an ethernet cable to a (standalone) router (or to a combo router / high speed modem) that is connected to a computer.
You would need a computer monitor connected to the computer too.
You could try doing that if you have a router.
.....

"You are thinking that I should not try to use the Input 5 DVI-D connection and use Input 3/4 instead with the cable you suggested which converts DVI-I to three audio/video plugs?"

NO.
You could do that, but as I said above, connecting to a single legacy composite video RCA port, or to a legacy S-Video port "results in a relatively crappy looking display" on the TV.

You would need to connect to a "TV Out" single RCA jack on the computer, or to a "S-Video" port on the computer, via either a S-Video to RCA jack gender adapter and a single RCA cable with (male) RCA plugs on both ends, or a legacy S-Video cable (4 pins on both ends.)
The "TV Out" video output is processed through a chip on the computers video adapter such that it's output conforms to legacy TV standards that are much older than computer monitor standards.
Playing a video looks acceptable but it's not HD video, and the text on the desktop screen looks crappy on the TV.

Does your computer have a "S-Video" port ? A single RCA jack for TV Out ?

Update - I looked at the User manual for your model - NO, it has neither.

("S-Video" port = a legacy S-Video port has only 4 pin holes, the legacy S-Video cable has only 4 pins on both ends. The "S-Video" port on computer graphics adapters has more pin holes, so it isn't a true S-Video port, but a legacy S-video cable, or a standard legacy S-Video (4 pins) to (single female) RCA jack gender adapter, plugs into and works with the graphics adapter's "S-Video" port fine. )
.........

What I was suggesting should work fine is a HD component video connection for the video - three RCA connections for the video.

Page 10 of pdf - 8 of manual

Component Video Y + PB + Pr cable

That has 3 RCA jacks on both ends - some things such as DVD players have the three RCA jacks for HD video.

What I'm suggesting is a custom cable not shown - a DVI-I connector to three RCA jacks
Something like this:
DVI-I to 3 RCA Component Cable - 6ft
http://www.amazon.com/DVI-I-RCA-Com...

page 21 of pdf - 19 of manual

Component video (Y + Pb + Pr)

Page 23 of pdf - 21 of manual

Video input 3 - all 3 jacks - HD video
Audio input 3 - audio for the HD video

Video input 4/Audio input 4 - same thing
.....

HDCP is NOT mentioned in the manual you found / the second manual I found.
If the DVI port is actually a DVI-HDCP port that's certainly not stated in the manual.

In theory, the DVD-D cable should work to get a display on the TV if it's truly dual link - it's possible it's end connectors have all the pins for dual link but only the pins for single link are wired up.
Did / does it say dual link on it's packaging ?
Or - do you have, or can you borrow, an ohm (resistance) meter, or a multi-meter, that you can use to check whether all pins are connected to each other via wires in the cable on both ends ? (~ 0 ohms between pins in the same position on both ends - they're connected.)
....

By the way, how long is the DVI-D cable ?

You're likely to have problems connecting to at least some displays if it's longer than the max spec ~ 15 feet.



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#17
March 17, 2012 at 10:24:04

You could get yourself a newer video adapter - a USB to DVI video adapter - but it may not solve your problem with your particular TV model.

E.g.
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicat...


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#18
March 17, 2012 at 17:47:36

Did you read the links I posted? Both the HDTV & the video card must be HDCP compliant. HDCP "works by encrypting a digital signal with a key that requires authentication from the transmitting and receiving product. If authentication fails then the signal fails, which means no picture on the TV screen."

Your HDTV is HDCP compliant but the outdated Intel Extreme 2 graphics are not. You need to use an analog connection, not digital.

http://www.delllow.com/product/imag...


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#19
March 17, 2012 at 19:11:17

Hi Guys -- You always make my head swim the first read, but I settle down by the time I get done. My cable does say dual link on the packaging. It is just six ft. I did read that there is a limit so went for the shortest I thought would work.

The TV manual is Thomson from 2003 their number on the back page is TOCOM1614682A. It doesn't have HDCP anywhere in the index, only HDTV. Pg 18 says is "uncompressed, high-speed digital visual interface designed to deliver digital video in its native format." for what that is worth.

I have everything boxed to take with me and plan to test the cable again tomorrow after church and if this fails I will try the DVI-I to RCA3 cable next. Surely something will work. Thanks guys. I will keep you informed.


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#20
March 17, 2012 at 20:28:35

"The TV manual is Thomson from 2003 their number on the back page is TOCOM1614682A. It doesn't have HDCP anywhere in the index, only HDTV"

Note what I said in response 16.....

"Update - I downloaded the manual you found by clicking on the floppy disk icon in the top bar of Adobe Acrobat Reader - it is NOT the same size as the second one I found - it's smaller.
The one I downloaded is
HDLP50W151_1614682A-1B_e-04.pdf "

It appears the second manual I found is probably the same as your printed manual, going by the 1614682A for both. .

"HDCP is NOT mentioned in the manual you found / the second manual I found.
If the DVI port is actually a DVI-HDCP port that's certainly not stated in the manual."

I searched both manuals using HDCP - nothing.

The DVI-I to three RCA cable should work fine, when the TV is set to the appropriate video input source....
- a DVD player that has the three RCA video ports works with the TV
- the computer probably can't tell the difference between a connection with that vs. a regular DVI connection to a computer monitor.
......

Have you owned this TV since it was new ?
If yes, has anyone tried connecting to the DVI port previously ?
If no, it's possible someone tried connecting to the DVI port previously and fried it's circuits.



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#21
March 23, 2012 at 15:12:30

Tubesandwires -- Well, it worked this time! I am not sure if it was the new video driver, or what made any difference. I did fiddle with the TV menu and inputs screen a bit, but I don't think anything there changed as input5 already seemed to be setup ok. But whatever the reason, I got the splash screen and then the windows screens. I was actually surprised since I hadn't gotten anything the first time. The screen doesn't quite fit right, but I rebooted again and it was a bit better. This will be great for making audio video presentations when we want to create something on our own anrather than find something on youtube. Thanks for all your expertise on DVI cables and what things could help. You kept me going in the right direction.

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#22
March 23, 2012 at 18:04:06

We're glad to hear you fixed your problem.
Thanks for the thanks.

I ssume you got the DVI connection to work.

".... I am not sure if it was the new video driver..."

The software on the hard drive has NOTHING to do with whether you get a display while booting BEFORE Windows loads.

The TV must be set to the right input AND there must be nothing wrong with the cable connection bewteen the computer and the TV BEFORE you boot the computer.

"The screen doesn't quite fit right, but I rebooted again and it was a bit better. "

From response 10

"Excerpts:

"Screen size and resolution 50-inch, 1280-by-720 pixel screen "

That's the only mention I've found of it's "native" or "optimal" resolution "

Set the resolution in Windows for the display to 1280 X 720



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#23
March 23, 2012 at 20:12:45

Yes, I had noticed the 1280 width but I am pretty sure I didn't get that done first so I need to adjust the resolution for the screen. When the PC is connected to the TV the resolutions available are different from when I had it connected to the DVI monitor, so I may need to mess with that still. I think it was still set at 1024 rather than 1280.

I forgot that you said that the drivers had nothing to do with the splash screen, so it must be the switching I did with the menu, even though a couple of inputs are not set to input5 and I had gone to input5 when I tried it before. It now works, so I won't wonder what and why.

Yes, I am using the DVI-D cable since the PC has only the DVI-I video output. Thanks again!


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#24
March 26, 2012 at 12:16:06

"When the PC is connected to the TV the resolutions available are different from when I had it connected to the DVI monitor"

- The resolution choices are often different when you connect via a VGA connection (e.g. if you used a DVI to VGA gender adapter with the DVI-I port) than they are when you're using a DVI connection. That's built into the specific video adapter drivers

- The resolution choices for the same type of connection, VGA or DVI, will be fewer or more depending on which Monitor type Windows detects or is set to detect.
- Default or unknown monitor - fewer choices
- Plug-n-Play monitor - the most resolution choices, but your monitor or display may not be able to display all of them, and in some cases choosing the wrong Advanced settings can DAMAGE your display, particularly if it's an LCD, LED (LED LCD), or Plasma display
- specific monitor drivers are loading for your monitor model when it's connected - by default Windows then only displays the settings and resolutions that both the monitor model and the specific video adapter drivers support. You can bypass that, but that's NOT recommended, particularly if it's an LCD, LED (LED LCD), or Plasma display.

..........

"... it must be the switching I did with the menu, even though a couple of inputs are not set to input5 and I had gone to input5 when I tried it before."


If you haven't already downloaded this, download it:

See the link after this line in response 16:

"User's Guide - 96 pages ...."

Is it the same manual as your printed one ?
Probably.

From response 20:

""The TV manual is Thomson from 2003 their number on the back page is TOCOM1614682A."

Note what I said in response 16.....

"Update - I downloaded the manual you found by clicking on the floppy disk icon in the top bar of Adobe Acrobat Reader - it is NOT the same size as the second one I found - it's smaller.
The one I downloaded is
HDLP50W151_1614682A-1B_e-04.pdf ""

"It appears the second manual I found is probably the same as your printed manual, going by the 1614682A for both."
..........


Page 35 of HDLP50W151_1614682A-1B_e-04.pdf

(Remote control button descriptions)

INPUT - Toggles through INPUT1, INPUt2, INPUT3, INPUT4, INPUT5, DTVLink (if available), lastly active antenna).

Do you see DTVLink ?

If you search the *.pdf for: input1, input 1, input 2, input 3, etc, there are lots of "hits".


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