Solved Dell Latitude won't boot, blinking lights

Dell Latitude d630 notebook
November 30, 2014 at 14:59:04
Specs: window 7 home premimum, intel core 2 Duo; 3gb RAM
My daughter's Dell Latitude D630 was working just fine one night. The next night she tried to turn it on and it would not boot. The power light and number lock light are on steady, and the caps lock and scroll lock light are blinking. I searched Google and read some posts and such which said to check the memory. I removed both modules and replaced them, switched them around, tried with each one separately, and it's still doing it.

So now I turn to you....Help?
Please let me know what other info you need, I can get it!

OMG don't judge me!


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✔ Best Answer
January 4, 2015 at 17:33:39
OK, thanks for taking the trouble to give us the feedback.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
November 30, 2014 at 19:56:31
I've worked with a lot of similar Dell Latitudes including the D630, and the reference sheet I use is on this page: http://www.bay-wolf.com/portpostcod...

That page indicates the system is not detecting any memory module is installed. Try just the one on the bottom, and make sure it is pressed in all the way, like as far as it can. Let me know if it works.

Even in a book of lies, sometimes you find truth.


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#2
December 1, 2014 at 00:14:19
It may be worth doing this?

Disconnect all power - including the battery.
Remove all memory modules.
Clean their edge connectors with a soft pencil type eraser.
Re-insert each module and then remove them again.
Re-insert each module again - ensuring each is securely and fully inserted.

Restore power and see the system will boot up OK.

The edge connectors can become slghtly oxidised, and modules can also become slightly displaced from their sockets over time.

Cleaning and re-inserting as above will help remove oxidisation on the modules; and the sockets are similarly cleaned (a little) by the repeated re-insertion routine.

This cleaning method is often suggested here by the regulars. Ensure to use a "soft" eraser (nothing abrasive), and the ensure any traces (bits) of the eraser are removed from the module connectors.


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#3
December 1, 2014 at 03:37:48
sometimes just by removing battery and power from ac and holding power button in for about thirty to 60 seconds will clear it and it will then boot also.

Davidw


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#4
December 1, 2014 at 21:38:16
I just wanted to let you know that I got your messages.and I will try 'll tomorrow. I have been busy and not able to check this. I have tried the holding the power button thing a few times and it hasn't worked. Thanks for the ideas, will post after I give them all a go!

OMG don't judge me!


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#5
January 4, 2015 at 17:29:40
Alright, so I tried everything that was suggested, to no avail. I am supposed to pick up a motherboard this week to try out, we shall see. If not, well, looks like I will be selling it on eBay or something like that.

Thanks for all the help!

OMG don't judge me!


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#6
January 4, 2015 at 17:33:39
✔ Best Answer
OK, thanks for taking the trouble to give us the feedback.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
January 4, 2015 at 17:56:31
Very long shot...

Download and burn an ISO of Ubuntu to a dvd. Then see if it will boot with that dvd.

If it does... then the motherboard is ok.

If it does boot up that way, then see if you can access the hard drive. If you can... copy all critical files (personal stuff) to to external storage (typically dvd, but another hard drive too is nice). Then set about discovering what's really amiss.

The Linux boot routine effectively tests out a system more or less completely; as it loads itself into RAM only. The local hard drive is not involved at all, unless you opt to install Linus - which do NOT.

Ubuntu.com is where to find the free ISO.

If you decide tp replace the system entirely, remove the local drive and via a usb adapter or similar, you can access the contents. Typically one either puts the drive into a suitable enclosure, or uses a dock, or a cable set; the external enclosure is of course generally the best. The drive is then safe and can be used accordingly. And again save anything critical on it to dvd as well.

Do not pass the system with the drive installed; or if you do then first recover files - usb adapter etc., - then reformat the drive. But check the dvd copies of data are accessible on at least one other working system.


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