Custom built PC doesnt recognize SATA HD on cold restart

March 3, 2012 at 06:44:50
Specs: Wndows 7

Hi, I have just built a new pc for the first time and everything went well. The only problem I have is after it has been turned off for a while and I turn it back on it won't find my hard drive unless I open it up and change SATA connections. It then runs fine until the text time it has been turned off for a while and it does the same thing.
I am running windows 7 64bit and my mother board is Gigabyte GA-990XA-UD3, AMD 990X, S AM3+, DDR3, SATA III - 6Gb/s, RAID SATA, PCIe 2.0 (x16), ATX

I would appreciate any help.


See More: Custom built PC doesnt recognize SATA HD on cold restart

Report •


#1
March 3, 2012 at 10:21:36

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.


Report •

#2
March 3, 2012 at 15:24:54

Thanks for the reply, but I don't think it is the connections.

Report •

#3
March 3, 2012 at 19:57:11

Did you load all of your motherboard drivers?
Did you reset your defaults in your BIOS when you started or since?
Have you manually checked the BIOS settings for your SATA drives?
If you have not, download your motherboard's manual in PDF format and look up your BIOS settings.
If the motherboard was not new or it sat on the shelf for quite a while then the CMOS battery may need replacing, especially if this happens when you unplug the system or turn off the power strip/surge protector (as many do for safety or energy conservation).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 21, 2012 at 15:21:40

Still having problems. When I turn it on it takes a while to for ir to go to "loading operating system". Then it wants to boot from cd. When I go in bios the hard drive is not there. I restart a few times and then it finds it. Do you think it might be a faulty hard drive? or is it something else?

Report •

#5
March 21, 2012 at 18:41:31

"Thanks for the reply, but I don't think it is the connections."

I'm answering that politely rather than rudely.....

Did you check to see whether your SATA data cables "latch" on both ends as I described ?
.....

I haven't heard of having to do this for recent mboards, and I haven't had to do it for any new mboard for at least 3 years for any IDE or SATA II hard drive, but for some older mboards, in the Bios Setup there is a setting where you can specify how long the bios can take to detect a hard drive. In some cases you had to increase that time from the default setting in order to have the mboard reliably detect a hard drive while booting every time.

"When I turn it on it takes a while to for ir to go to "loading operating system". "

What do mean by "a while" - how many seconds ?

"Then it wants to boot from cd."

I can understand it wanting to boot from a bootable CD or DVD BEFORE the operating system loads, but NOT the other way around.

If you have a bootable CD or DVD in a drive (Windows Vista or Windows 7 is on a DVD, not a CD) while booting the computer, depending on Boot Order or similar settings in the bios Setup, you may see "Press any key to boot from CD" or similar on the screen. You will see that line if there is a booable CD or DVD in a drive whether you press the stated key or not.

You don't get prompted to insert a CD or DVD AFTER the operating system loads unless something went wrong while trying to install software from a CD or DVD previously.
Are you getting a message ?
If yes, quote the message.


Report •

#6
March 22, 2012 at 02:02:22

I have check the connection numerous times and change cable so I'm pretty sure its not that.

When I say I while it can be over a minute and a half then it trys to load operating system. This is where it asks to boot from cd/dvd. I have the hard drive to boot first. If I go into bios it shows up my cd/dvd drive, but no hard drive. If I restart my pc 3,4,5 times it will eventually detect it and load.


Report •

#7
March 22, 2012 at 05:14:39

List ALL of your hardware including makes and model numbers. List the details on the label of the power supply (all amperage ratings).
List the Voltages reported in your BIOS set up. These MUST be within 5% of their nominal specs.
These should be run from bootable CD's so set your boot order to that first:
Run Memtest86 to verify your memory is without errors.
Run hard drive utility from your hard drive mfg or Seatools from Seagate to test your hard drive for problems.
Post results.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#8
March 22, 2012 at 08:46:18

You haven't said whether you have found that there's no problem with the data cables "latching" into their sockets. If any end connectors are NOT "latching", you WILL have problems, unless you fasten the end of the cable in place so it can't come out of it's socket.
.....

Examine your bios settings to see if you can lengthen the time the bios takes to detect hard drives.
....

"When I say I while it can be over a minute and a half then it trys to load operating system."

You haven't provided enough description for us to speculate why that may be the case.

You MUST install the main chipset drivers for your mboard after Windows' Setup has completed in order to be sure than your mboard's capabilities are recognized properly by the operating system.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

E.g. If you haven't installed the main chipset drivers....
- the built in support the operating system has for USB 2.0 / USB 3.0 controllers and devices has NOT been installed in Windows.
- it's likely your hard drive(s) and optical drive(s) will run slower than they are capable of.

Your SATA drives can't achieve their full "burst" data transfer speed unless
- the SATA controller drivers for the mboard have been installed in Windows,
- and the bios Setup has the SATA controllers in SATA or AHCI mode, or SATA RAID mode if you're using a RAID array. .
I've noticed that most new mboards these days have the SATA controllers set to an IDE compatible mode by default in the bios Setup - max "burst" data transfer speed 133 mb/sec .

Some SATA II conventional desktop hard drives - e.g. at least some Seagate models - come with a jumper installed on them on the back of the drive that limits them to 150 mb/sec "burst" data transfer speed. You must remove the jumper or install it in a different position on pins there in order for the drive to be able to achieve it's full "burst" data transfer speed of 300 mb/sec.
Similar may apply to conventional SATA III hard drives.

If you have been installed software, and/or if Windows Automatic Update has been installing Windows updates, there is often some delay before the desktop screen appears the next time you boot the computer because some of the software must be installed before Windows loads normally.
When you restart the computer right after the desktop screen has fully loaded and the cpu / hard drive activity has diminished, the desktop screen will appear sooner.
....


"....then it trys to load operating system. This is where it asks to boot from cd/dvd."

As I said in response 5....

"I can understand it wanting to boot from a bootable CD or DVD BEFORE the operating system loads, but NOT the other way around."

"You don't get prompted to insert a CD or DVD AFTER the operating system loads unless something went wrong while trying to install software from a CD or DVD previously.
Are you getting a message ?
If yes, quote the message. "

Have you installed, or have you attempted to install, software from a CD or DVD other than the Windows DVD ?

If yes....

If you have installed anti-malware software, this my be the reason the software did NOT install properly.....

NOTE that sometimes the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs - a part that runs all the time scanning for suspicious activity - will interfere with the proper installation of third party software, or major Microsoft updates that cannot be installed automatically by Automatic Update, the software will not install properly, and you may get no indication of that at all while installing the software.
To avoid that possibility, you should always DISABLE the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs, BEFORE you install third party software (software other than most Microsoft Updates, etc., that did not come with Windows ), especially when it's a major or complicated software package.
E.g. if you are using the free or paid version of AVG, you should disable the Resident Shield in AVG's 's settings in Windows (in AVG 2012 that's done under the title AntiVirus). In Norton (Symantec) products, there may be several things you need to disable, or set so they don't load for a specific short amount of time.
If you don't know how to do that, tell us which anti-malware software you are using.
When you are sure the software has installed correctly, re-enable the resident module(s).

Further info...

How to disable your security applications
http://www.techsupportforum.com/for...
.......

It is COMMON for people to install "drivers" incorrectly !

Unless the instructions for installing a device tell you otherwise......
(this ALWAYS applies to sound and video adapter software.....) .
You DO NOT install drivers for a device while booting into Windows, if the software for the device has not been installed yet - when Windows detects a generic device or New Hardware while booting, you allow it to search for drivers, it doesn't find any, and it wants you to show it the location of the drivers - CANCEL that, continue on to the desktop, and install the software for the device using the proper installation from a CD or the proper installation file that you downloaded from the web.

The same applies no matter when Windows pops up Found New Hardware !

(The following also applies if you want to re-install the sound software)


If you DID install drivers that way, go to Control Panel - display as Small Icons or Large Icons (not Categories) - Programs and Features and Un-install the software you installed, reboot, DO NOT install drivers while booting; .DO NOT install drivers no matter when Windows pops up Found New Hardware !

Then let the desktop screen load and go to Device Manager.

(Where is Device Manager in Vista and Windows 7 ?

Double click on the Computer icon, click on System properties in the top bar, Device Manager is on the left.)

For sound "drivers" only............

If the sound device is still listed, RIGHT click on it and Un-install it (that may take a while).
If it was still listed in Device Manager, reboot at least once after you have un-installed it.
DO NOT install drivers while booting, and then install the sound software the right way !

Continue on to the desktop screen, and install the software for the device using the proper installation from a CD or the proper installation file that you downloaded from the web.

........



Report •

#9
March 22, 2012 at 17:13:06

I think I may have cracked it, I had IDE set in bios. When I set it to ACHI it would crash when windows tried to load. So I did this http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976

Changed my settings to ACHI and so far so good.

Thank you very much for all your help.


Report •

#10
March 22, 2012 at 18:19:37

Having the SATA controllers set to an IDE compatible mode in the bios does NOT cause the symptoms you had - it just limits the max burst data transfer speed of the SATA hard drives to 133 mb /sec, rather than 150, 300, or 600 mb /sec, depending on the type of SATA drive you have.

No hard drive or optical drive runs at it's max burst data transfer speed all the time in any case.

" I've noticed that most new mboards these days have the SATA controllers set to an IDE compatible mode by default in the bios Setup.... "

They do that so that you don't have to provide and install SATA controller drivers at the beginning of loading files from the Windows CD or DVD - you can complete Setup and install the SATA controller divers later, then change the SATA controller mode in the bios to SATA or AHCI..
If the SATA controllers are set to AHCI or SATA mode in the bios when you attempt to install Windows, you must provide and install the SATA controller drivers otherwise the Windows disk may not detect the SATA drives at all.
2000 and XP have no built in drivers for SATA drive controllers. Vista and Windows 7 have drivers for some of them, but not all of them.


Report •

#11
March 23, 2012 at 01:54:38

You are quite right and I thought this might be it. I came to my pc after leaving it over night and it can't find the hdd again. After 4 attempts at restarting it loads up. My cables are latched properly, chipset drivers were all installed and even updated from the gigabyte website.

I have done a test using seagate tools and that was fine.

I'm really beginning to think it;s the HDD.


Report •

#12
March 23, 2012 at 10:08:09

"My cables are latched properly..."

Good, if that's for both the data cables and the SATA power cables.
Have you tried swapping the SATA data cable used for the hard drive with another one ?
The SATA data cables that came with the mboard would be capable of supporting SATA III max burst data transfer speeds. I don't know if data cables for SATA II or SATA drives would work properly with SATA III drives.

"....chipset drivers were all installed and even updated from the gigabyte website"

The software installed on the hard drive has no effect regarding whether the bios version detects hard drives properly while booting.

There are no bios updates for your mboard model that mention fixing a problem with the bios version detecting hard drives properly.
There are no FAQs for your model that mention the problem.

(Never update your bios version unless the release notes specifically mention fixing a problem you're having. Usually the only legitimate reason for updating the bios version is for it to support recognizing a CPU type your prevent bios version doesn't recognize properly.Never install a BETA (a test version, not a final version) bios update unless it's release notes mention fixing a problem you've having. )

A message while booting "No operating system found" or similar DOES NOT necessarily indicate the bios is not detecting the hard drive.

The bios not detecting a hard drive at all while booting,
- or - the bios detecting it while booting but not detecting that any partition on it is bootable,
are two different situations.
The latter situation can be caused by problems with the data on the hard drive.

E.g. If drive is sometmes found to bootable, if there's nothing wrong with the drive or the Windows installation's data itself, for XP you can usually fix that problem by running fixboot and/or or fixmbr in the Recovery Console.

If the hard drive you installed Windows 7 on had data on it previously, you might need to do something similar.

What are the system recovery options in Windows 7?
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/...

See the info about Startup Repair - run it.
.........

"I have done a test using seagate tools and that was fine.

I'm really beginning to think it;s the HDD."

If the hard drive tests fine in the LONG SeaTools test, then there's nothing wrong with it.
....

Are you using a SATA II or a SATA III hard drive ?
(the one Windows has been installed on)

As I said above....

"Some SATA II conventional desktop hard drives - e.g. at least some Seagate models - come with a jumper installed on them on the back of the drive that limits them to 150 mb/sec "burst" data transfer speed. You must remove the jumper or install it in a different position on pins there in order for the drive to be able to achieve it's full "burst" data transfer speed of 300 mb/sec.
Similar may apply to conventional SATA III hard drives"

I have bought three Seagate SATA II 500 gb drives - all three already had the jumper installed.

For a SATA III drive, if such a jumper is installed, that would limit it to either 150 mb/sec or 300 mb/sec burst data transfer speed

Does your hard drive have such a jumper and/or is it SATA II ?

If yes, I looked at the manual for your mboard. There is one default bios setting that enables SATA III support that MAY cause you problems if the drive can't run that fast.

Integrated Peripherals - OnChip SATA 3.0 support - Enabled (default)
If you are using a SATA II hard drive, whether a jumper is installed on it or not, of if you have a SATA III hard drive that is jumpered to max run slower, you may need to Disable that.

Side notes.....
These settings only affect the max burst data transfer speed -

OnChip SATA Type - Native IDE (default) , RAID (SATA RAID), or AHCI (SATA)
= (what I call) the SATA controller mode

(You probably can't use RAID mode or make a RAID array of drives unless you have at least two SATA hard drives connected. If you want to use a RAID array, you must set it up BEFORE you install an operating system.)

OnChip SATA Port 4/5 type .......etc. - IDE (default) or SATA Type- configurable only if
OnChip SATA Type is set to RAID or AHCI

Do you have those two settings set to AHCI and SATA Type ?

.....

I'm assuming that
- the mboard itself is booting fine EVERY TIME you boot the computer - you see normal video while booting BEFORE the hard drive is supposed to be detected, you hear the normal POST beep. If that's not always your case, something else is wrong.
E.g. If you're not always hearing the normal POST beep but you do sometimes, remove the AC power to the case, make sure your ram is fully seated, all your cards in mboard slots are fully seated, and all connectors from the power supply are fully seated in their sockets .

- if you have a video card or video cards installed in (a) mboard PCI-E X16 slot(s), that your system is using a power supply that has at least the minimum recommended wattage capacity that the video chipset(s) on the card(s) require(s).

If you do have one or more such video cards, which one(s) is (are) it (they), what is the max wattage capacity of your power supply ?

- your current voltages shown in the bios Setup for +3.3 v, + 5.0 v. and +12.0 v are within 10% of their nominal values.

- you are not overclocking anything in the bios Setup by changing settings from default values.
..........

Possible problems.

What brand is your ram ? We have gotten reports of problems with certain brands e.g. G-Skil, OCZ - when the person is using more than one module The settings the bios has chosen may need to be tweaked

You can have this problem even when a memory diagnostics program finds no problems with your ram.

Some ram manufacturer's modules do not strictly adhere to the JEDEC standards that most mboards bioses use to determine ram settings.
In that case, the ram settings in the bios Setup that the bios has automatically chosen may not be correct.
Check the ram settings in your bios - the ram voltage, and the ram timing numbers - those should be the same as for the specs for the modules themselves. Often the ram voltage and timing numbers are printed on the label on the modules.

If the voltage setting or timings settings in the bios are different from the specs for the ram, change them in the bios. The timing numbers must be as close as you can get to the same, or slower timings (higher numbers = slower) - you won't notice the difference the slower settings make.

If you have a mix of different modules
- don't mix ram that different voltages are specified for - the bios will force the ram to use the lowest voltage, if "by spd" or similar is used (default settings) - ram that a higher voltage is specified for is more likely to not work properly in that situation.
- the bios settings must be those for the slowest timing settings of all the modules, or slower (higher numbers = slower).

Somewhere in the bios you can see displayed the current ram voltage and ram timing settings the bios is set to.

Maybe here ?

MB Intelligent Tweaker - Dram Configuration

DDR3 Timing Items Auto (default)
May need to be set to Manual to display current timing settings ?

By the way...

DTS mode - Unganged (default)
If you have a pair or pairs of matched (identical) modules installed in the proper ram slots, you'll get a slight performance boost it that's set to Ganged

All ram must be pairs in the right slots, otherwise the bios auto uses Unganged mode. .
....

I said....

"Examine your bios settings to see if you can lengthen the time the bios takes to detect hard drives."

...but I've found no such setting in the bios settings in the manual for your mboard model.
.....

GA-990XA-UD3 (rev. 1.x) (home support paqe)
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/pr...

Manual, English
http://download.gigabyte.us/FileLis...



Report •

#13
March 24, 2012 at 07:13:52

Sounds like a flaky power supply or bad power connector. Other than that, from what u stated, it could be a bad northbridge on ur mainboard. Could also be, if u have a green drive of sorts, the drive is not spinning up fast enough so u'll want to set the spin up delay in ur bios. If not, just get a new drive

Report •

#14
March 30, 2012 at 07:29:22

SATA data cables are sensitive to being tightly folded. If your cable is folded back on itself you can try to open it up. You may need to replace the cable.

You didn't state the model of your SATA hard drive. Please do so now.


Report •

#15
March 30, 2012 at 08:50:06

Regarding what I said in response 2.....

"A message while booting "No operating system found" or similar DOES NOT necessarily indicate the bios is not detecting the hard drive. "

If that's what your problem is....

Since my last post in this topic, I have built, and installed Windows and other software on, a new desktop system for a friend, all new parts.
The mboard is Asus M5A99X EVO.
Windows was installed on a relatively small Corsair solid state SATA-III drive, the system also has a conventional 2 TB SATA-III drive

I discovered some weird things about the bios settings for that mboard.
The same or similar may apply to your mboard's bios Setup.

Default bios settings do not automatically detect the Windows 7 DVD.
You have to go into the bios and specify the optical drive the DVD is in (only one blu-ray drive was installed) as the first device you want the bios to try to boot from.

I installed Windows 7 from the DVD fine, the computer and Windows 7's Setup restarted the computer several times automatically as they're supposed to do, Windows 7 loaded successfully the first time, but THEN, the next time the computer was started up, I got a message while booting similar to "No operating system found" .
The same thing happened after restarting the computer by pressing Ctrl-Alt-Del, or by holding the power button in until the mboard shut off, then starting up the system.

I found I had to go into the bios Setup and specify the drive Windows was installed on as the first device the bios attempts to boot from, then I never got that message while booting similar to "No operating system found" again.

The mboard has the last available bios version installed. Loading bios defaults did not change the situation, when the blu-ray drive had also been set to be the first thing the bios tries to boot the system from.
There's no mention of the problem I had in the release notes for any bios update version for the mboard, or in the FAQs specifically for the model, on the Global Asus Support web site.

I have not encountered a bios for a new mboard that behaves that way since the early 2000's .
For mboards newer than that, I could always specify something else before the hard drive in the Boot Order or similar settings and there was no problem booting from bootable hard drive.

E.g. This boot order worked fine for any situation....

Floppy drive
CD drive
Hard drive

When there is a bootable floppy disk in the floppy drive, the system boots from the floppy disk.

When there is a floppy disk that is NOT bootable in the floppy drive, the boot sequence halts - normal behavior. A message similar to "No operating system found" .

When there is no floppy disk in the floppy drive, and no bootable CD or DVD in an optical drive, the hard drive boots fine

When there is no floppy disk in the floppy drive and there is a bootable CD or DVD in an optical drive,
- if the bios detects NO bootable hard drive partition, the bootable Windows CD or DVD loads automatically
- if the bios DOES detect a bootable hard drive partition, if I don't respond to "Press any key to boot from CD" or similar, the hard drive boots fine



Report •

#16
March 31, 2012 at 01:51:40

Gigabyte GA-990XA-UD3, AMD 990X, S AM3+, DDR3, SATA III - 6Gb/s, RAID SATA, PCIe 2.0 (x16), ATX

Seagate 1TB SATA 3 ST1000DM003 Performance Hard Drive OEM

Sorry I haven't replyed straight away, this is a time consuming problem. I can only try and change things when it doesn't load. Once I have windows up it doesn't do it for a while and so I have wait till next time it does it to try something different.


Report •

#17
April 8, 2012 at 21:57:34

Hi Charlie,
On your motherboard the HD should be connected to SATA3_0 and your bios set to auto under standard cmos features. In advanced bios features try switching HDD SMART capability on and off for a while for testing. In integrated peripherals make sure onchip sata controller is enabled and try testing with onchip sata3.0 support disabled for a while. Lastly try enabling ESP on your SATA port.

If you have overclocked your system its possible that could be causing unstable operation. Make sure your testing on stock settings. Try saving the bios both by using the bios gui's save and exit and the f11 save cmos options.

If this all fails to fix your problems you may have to remove your motherboard from the case. Try testing on the motherboard box to reduce the chance your grounding on the case. If the motherboard is grounding on the case it could possibly causing the occasional undetected HD problem.

Here is a link to gigabytes tech support page where you can ask them about your problem.
http://ggts.gigabyte.com/tech.asp?C...


Report •


Ask Question