Connection does no work

Linksys Wireless-n ethernet bridge
October 1, 2009 at 16:21:06
Specs: Windows XP
I recently moved up to a garage apartment with my little brother. I ran a jack from the main house to the outside of the apartment. a 5 foot cable connects the linksys bridge to the jack inside. from the jack on the outside of the apartment i have a cable connecting it to a jack in the attic of the apartment. from the jack it goes to another jack inside my bed room. from there it goes to me computer... my computer has a connection but has limited to no connectivity... why? please help me

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#1
October 1, 2009 at 17:48:33
I would say the multiple connectors are 'probably' causing the problem.

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#2
October 1, 2009 at 17:53:08
What type of cable are you talking of?
Coax cable?
Telephone cable?
Network cable?

Does the wireless connection from the computer to the bridge work fine when you connect to the bridge in the house?

Have you tried connecting wirelessly previously?
If you haven't the settings on both ends of the wireless connection have to be compatible. E.g. if an encryption key or password is being used on one end, the same key or password has to be used on the other end. XP SP2 or later automatically requires you to assign an encryption key or password to the wireless adapter on the computer when you set it up in Windows itself.


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#3
October 2, 2009 at 08:19:30
The wireless router is inside the main house and the wireless works all the way to the apartment... i did all the connections myself and it is ran with Cat-5 wire all the way. We are going to put another router up in the attic so do you think that might help? Ill write a run through on the set up. FRom the router inside the house it goes to a jack in the wall which runs outside along the power line to a jack on the side of the apartment. from that box a cable with two heads runs from the jack in the box into the attic and into a router ( dont have the router yet but that is what im going to do). from the router i will have 3 wires connecting it to 3 jacks which run to the different bed rooms. Does that set up sound like it should work or is it just to many jacks for internet to work?

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#4
October 2, 2009 at 13:34:04
What do you have in the house?

A standalone high speed modem connected to a wireless router?
or
A combo high speed modem / wireless router (a.k.a. a Gateway, usually ADSL or DSL)?

What brand and model is the wireless router, or combo high speed modem / wireless router ?
.....

"The wireless router is inside the main house and the wireless works all the way to the apartment"

Does it work inside the apartment?
If that's so, you don't need to run any cable to the apartment, unless you want to connect to a computer in the apartment via a network cable.

"i did all the connections myself and it is ran with Cat-5 wire all the way."

Did you install the end connectors on the cable yourself?
If so, they may not be connected properly - some routers (e.g. D-Link) have a cable testing utility built in, but both ends must be connected to something.

Cat 5 is okay for 10/100 mbps wired connections, but I believe a 10/100/1000 mbps (gigabit) connection requires Cat 6 cabling to achieve it's max. data transfer speed.

"FRom the router inside the house it goes to a jack in the wall which runs outside along the power line ..."

It's NOT a good idea to run it close to a power line. The power line has no electromagnetic shielding - the network cable does, but the amount of electromagnetic interference that can be picked up by the power line by the network cable when it's right next to the power cable can easily overwhelm the capabilities of the network cable's shielding.
The amount of interference picked up by the network cable is directly proportional to the square of the distance between it and the source of the interference - e.g. twice as far, 1/4 the intensity.

"from that box a cable with two heads runs from the jack in the box into the attic and into a router ( dont have the router yet but that is what im going to do). from the router i will have 3 wires connecting it to 3 jacks which run to the different bed rooms"

You DO NOT normally connect a router to a router - if you do, the settings of the second router must be changed to disable it's WAN capabilities.

E.g. go here
http://linksys.custhelp.com/
Product: Wireless Routers and Gateways
Problem type - 3rd box - Connecting Multiple Routers / Access Points - click on Search - select 3733
There's also one there for Gateways.

The only reason you would want to even try that is if you already have two routers and don't want to buy a switch or access point.
We had a guy who started a subject here fairly recently who had two routers he wanted to connect and he had a heck of a time figuring out how to get the second router to work - in fact I'm not sure whether he ever did.
He had a combo high speed modem/router, and a Linksys wireless N router he wanted to connect to it because the original router had no wireless capability.

You normally connect a router to a switch or a wireless switch or a wirelesss access point or similar . The switch or access point usually has 4 or more ports you can connect computers to via network cables, just like a router does.

Also
go here
http://linksys.custhelp.com/
Product: Wireless Routers and Gateways
Problem type - 3rd box - Weak Signals / Intermittant Connections - click on Search



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