Computer shutting down randomly and without warning

August 19, 2012 at 08:43:13
Specs: Windows 7
Hi,

First I should say I do not know much about computers so forgive me if I'm slow.

Recently my computer has been shutting down at random points without any warning at all.

It seems to happen more frequently if it is not given some time off. For example, it usually shuts down during the boot if I attempt to turn it back on straight away.

This has been happening for about a week now and I've tried everything I can think of. It's also started resetting BIOS options like which hard drive to boot off and time and date although it didn't always do this.

I haven't installed any new hardware recently and I have a electrical fan set up next to it to avoid any heat ups (I am 99% sure that's not the problem)

Thank you very much
MM


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#1
August 19, 2012 at 09:49:36
Have you tried blowing out the case with compressed air? Even with a fan setup it still could be overheating internally.

You've been helped by a 14 year old.


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#2
August 19, 2012 at 10:31:44
Disable Automatic restart when error(s) occurs.
http://pcsupport.about.com/od/windo...
Report back if u see the blue screen of death(blue background & white text).

Check CPU temperature in BIOS.

A bad power supply unit can cause system to restart without any warning.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#3
August 19, 2012 at 14:19:10
"Disable Automatic restart when error(s) occurs."

Tried that but it doesn't seem to stop the shut down. I do sometimes get a blue screen saying Dumping physical memory and then the computer restarts but this is quite rare.

---

"Have you tried blowing out the case with compressed air? Even with a fan setup it still could be overheating internally."

I'll give that a go but I've put my hand on what I assume is the motherboards memory (pretruding metal grating) after some of the shut downs, sometimes it's hot but a lot of the time it's quite cool.


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Related Solutions

#4
August 19, 2012 at 15:27:47
I do not mean to be derogatory but if you think that a protruding metal grating is the motherboard's memory you clearly have no idea how a PC is put together and how to troubleshoot a system. What you have described may just be heatspreaders attached to the RAM or it could be some other heatsink on another component. Asking you to list your full system specifications will probably be a waste of time but If you have a name-brand system you should be able to at least tell us the make/model number so we can get some idea. If it is forgetting BIOS settings such as date/time and boot order etc that is usually a sign of a flat CMOS battery. That is a flat circular battery about 1.7cm diameter and maintains the BIOS settings when main power to the system is turned off. It needs replacing.
Overheating may be a contributing factor and the suggestion of blowing out the dust using a can of compressed air has merit. Open the case and look for the fan on top of the large heatsink. That's what you need to clean the dust out of as it sits on top of the CPU ( Processor). That is your PC's main brain and what generates the most heat.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#5
August 20, 2012 at 04:14:44
Sorry computer hardware isn't my strong suit at all.

The moherboards an ECS GF7050vt-m5
It has an intel pentium dual processor (E2200 model number)
2gb RAM (Had 4 but several months ago a cartridge was damaged)
The graphics card is a NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GT
and it's running Windows 7 Ultimate

--

I noted last night after a shut down that if I tried to start up right away it would instantly shut down again. Leaving it alone for a while seems to give it more time until the next shutdown.


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#6
August 20, 2012 at 14:16:52
I noted last night after a shut down that if I tried to start up right away it would instantly shut down again. Leaving it alone for a while seems to give it more time until the next shutdown.

Or cool down? Sounds a lot like overheating.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
August 20, 2012 at 20:16:02
Install HWMonitor to see what all of your internal temperatures are. You will get a minimum, maximum, and current set of temperatures if you launch it and minimize it, then use your computer and check the numbers every 5 or 10 minutes or so. They will show you if you are running hot and where that heat is centering.
As mentioned, blowing it out with a can of compressed air is about the best (and first) thing we would recommend.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
August 21, 2012 at 06:28:47
"2gb RAM (Had 4 but several months ago a cartridge was damaged)"

Which begs the question: How did one of your sticks of ram become damaged and are you certain the remaining stick is still error-free?

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#9
October 1, 2012 at 08:42:56
Hey folks sorry that I've been away from this.

The problem got worse and worse until the computer wouldn't turn on for more then a second. I think it's dead.

"
"2gb RAM (Had 4 but several months ago a cartridge was damaged)"

Which begs the question: How did one of your sticks of ram become damaged and are you certain the remaining stick is still error-free? "

They we're in packs brand new. One got a monitor dropped on it and there was a dent in the side. It caused a crash to run with both ram cards but running with the non damaged one seemed to work perfectly.


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