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computer shuts down while burning

January 25, 2006 at 20:07:58
Specs: windows xp corp w/sp2, sempron 2600/ 1 gig ram

First off this is my second build. On the first build i did my computer kept shuttin down when i was burning a dvd with nero. I then built a new computer with a lan party ut nf3 250 motherboard and a sempron 2600. i reused the same video card in the new board. The card is a BFG GeForce 5500. I also reused on of the 512mb memory sticks i had in the old board. the new computer worked fine for 2 days and now it has started restarting when burning a dvd. Thats the only time it does it i can play games like BF2 and Counter Strike source no problems. Could the memory stick or the video card be casueing the problem.

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#1
January 25, 2006 at 20:13:11

By the way the video card is in a apg slot not pci.

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#2
January 25, 2006 at 20:41:34

What is the wattage rating of your power supply? CD burning adds a power drain that could trip protective circuitry in your PSU if it is underpowered for your use. Check the specs from the PSU model number.

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#3
January 25, 2006 at 20:49:35

its a 480 watt power supply

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Related Solutions

#4
January 25, 2006 at 20:51:20

What you should try first if you can is to try something other than Nero, or at least look for patches/update it online if you can - a lot of people have problems with it, especially INCD. Or see if there are firmware updates for your burner you can install.

My brother had the same problem. What it turned out to be was his PS was defective.
Burning a DVD, or even a CD, strains your computer cpu more than most tasks do, which draws more current from the PS, and it was enough to trigger a black screen reboot on his computer. The computer seemed fine otherwise, the voltages looked good in the bios.
I swapped PS's and he has never had the problem since.
......

By the way, I would appreciate it if you would acknowlege answers to your posts, such as this one you made about two video cards, where there was no post from you after the original.

http://www.computing.net/hardware/wwwboard/forum/40964.html

When we go to the trouble of answering you, you should go back to it for 2 or 3 days and see what is there, or at least sign off when you know you are not going back to it.


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#5
January 25, 2006 at 21:16:43

480W should be adequate. Do you have anything else in this box that could contribute to high power drain? Try removing or disconnecting power to these and then used your CD burner. If the problem goes away, your PSU may be going bad or could be underpowered (even at 480W).

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#6
January 25, 2006 at 21:38:03

hi yea sorry about not responding to my last post about the 2 video cards. My computer has been down and i havnt gotten to even look at the post until today.

The PSU is new got it right before christmas. When i was burning a dvd with nero i look and my cpu usage was at 100% and not going down at all. I just remembered that i put a sleeving kit on the wires from the psu i need to cut off a tie wrap that was on there and cut the shild off of one of the black wires I checked all the other wire and they werent hurt and then i but some black tape around the wire that messed up.

Also i just ran mem test and one of the mem sticks failed and one is good. could that be casueing the problem.


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#7
January 25, 2006 at 22:51:08

"Also i just ran mem test and one of the mem sticks failed and one is good. could that be casueing the problem".

When posting, please try to give as much info as possible. You did not tell us how much/type of memory you have on each stick. 2x512MB?

However, failure of RAM is unusual. Try reseating the sticks or using different slots. Use the free program FreeRAM XP Pro from here to monitor RAM and CPU usage.

If the wire on one connector was damaged, try using another instead, and see if the problem goes away.

A damaged or underpowered PSU is still the most likely cause.



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#8
January 26, 2006 at 06:03:07

All PSUs are not created equal. Simply saying you have a 480W unit means nothing. There are $15 PSUs & there are $100 PSUs...generally, you get what you pay for. Hopefully it's a decent name brand unit & there's plenty of amperage on the +12v rail (18A or more).

Also, when configuring the IDE devices, it's best not to put 2 HDDs or 2 optical drives on the same cable/channel. When possible, the optical writer (burner) should be 2ndary master, the optical reader should be the primary slave.

Hellz Yea!


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#9
January 26, 2006 at 07:27:46

The PS that was defective on my brother's computer was an Antec, a brand considered to be very reliable, less than a year old, and over 400 watts, on a computer that need far less.

It is a lot more likely a cheap PS will give you problems sooner or later, often because they stretch the truth about their maximum capacities, and there are more poor PS's being sold now than ever before, but it can happen with any PS.
........

"I also reused on of the 512mb memory sticks i had in the old board. "

"Also i just ran mem test and one of the mem sticks failed and one is good. "

There's a better than 50% chance it was the one from your old computer, but it can be either.
Just because your old ram will fit in the new motherboard ram slots doesn't mean it will work properly in the new motherboard.
If you did what many people do and just go out and buy new ram at the cheapest price you can find without checking out the mboard ram module tests or a major brand name's web site that can tell what WILL modules work in your motherboard properly, there's a good chance it won't. Motherboards can be very specific about what specific ram module configurations work in them properly - that is COMMON.
There is probably nothing wrong with the module, assuming it hasn't been damaged by a bad PS or a bad power surge - it is just incompatible with your new motherboard.

(mcamax)
"However, failure of RAM is unusual."

Aha! Someone who doesn't buy the bad ram myth either.
....

(jam)
"Also, when configuring the IDE devices, it's best not to put 2 HDDs or 2 optical drives on the same cable/channel. When possible, the optical writer (burner) should be 2ndary master, the optical reader should be the primary slave."

That theory of yours again.
Not likely that would help with black screen / reboot problem.



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#10
January 26, 2006 at 07:49:27

"Also i just ran mem test and one of the mem sticks failed and one is good. "

In case you didn't make the connection,
incompatible ram will fail a ram test, not because it is bad, but because the motherboard can't deal with it properly. Hence the reason many people still believe in the bad ram myth.


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#11
January 26, 2006 at 08:31:31

Thanks guys i guess i'll go get a new power supply and try that and i'll test my old 512 stick of ram in my mom computer if i ever get over that way. Thanks Again

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#12
January 26, 2006 at 09:42:47

I'd like to add one comment to jam's. He is right about quality, of course. The more expensive power supplies are the one's that have protective circuitry to prevent toasting other parts of your PC. There is a chance that your PSU is doing exactly what it is designed to do, i.e., interrupt operation. Run the test in response#5.

As advised, your PSU could be going bad. See this on selecting a PSU. Good luck!



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#13
January 26, 2006 at 10:40:09

"That theory of yours again.
Not likely that would help with black screen / reboot problem"

Never said the IDE config had anything to do with the reboot problem. I was just pointing it out because WAY too many people still believe pairing up an optical drive with the HDD is *bad*. For optimal data transfers & less likelihood of burning coasters, IDE devices should be configured so that the data transfers from one channel to the other, not between 2 devices on the same channel. That is fact, not theory...

Hellz Yea!


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#14
January 26, 2006 at 14:48:42

When two devices of different speeds are placed on the same IDE channel, the processor makes them both transfer data at the slower speed. So here it makes sense to put devices of different speeds on different channels. See here.

I suppose then if you had two equal-speed drives, you could put them on the same channel. But a HDD and a CDROM should be on different channels, if you have two channels.


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#15
January 26, 2006 at 16:19:46

There were/are reasons why certain devices shouldn't share the same channel, but for the most part, that relates to older hardware.

Here's a few quotes from PCGuide.com:

"By its very nature, each IDE/ATA channel can only deal with one request, to one device, at a time. You cannot even begin a second request, even to a different drive, until the first request is completed. This means that if you put two devices on the same channel, they must share it. In practical terms, this means that any time one device is in use, the other must remain silent. In contrast, two disks on two different IDE/ATA channels can process requests simultaneously on most motherboards. The bottom line is that the best way to configure multiple devices is to make each of them a single drive on its own channel, if this is possible."

That statement should help explain why a burner should be on the opposite channel of the drive it's copying from. If you copy CDs "on the fly" (from reader to writer), the reader should be on the primary channel & the writer (burner) should be on the 2ndary channel. That way there's a constant data flow. If both devices share the same channel, there will be constant buffering, so not only will it take longer, but the buffering increases the risks of producing "coasters". The same thing applies to transferring data from the HDD to the burner.

IDE contollers have used "Independent Device Timing" since the days of the socket 7. In other words, the controller supports running the master and slave device on the same channel at different transfer rates. An ATA33 device will NOT cause an ATA100 device to slow to ATA33 speed...they will operate independently of each other.

"Since the transfer modes associated with the IDE/ATA interface are constantly being improved, new devices support faster transfer modes than older ones do. In addition, hard disks often support faster transfer modes than ATAPI devices such as optical drives do. Yet, these devices can be combined on the same IDE/ATA channel, raising the question of compatibility when the devices are together.

The ability of an IDE/ATA channel to operate a master and slave device using different transfer modes is called independent device timing. The hard disk controllers integrated on modern chipsets all pretty much support independent timing, as do modern add-in controllers, but this was not always the case."

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/conf_Performance.htm

Hellz Yea!


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#16
January 26, 2006 at 17:24:31

Good info, jam. I guess the age of your system determines if you have channels that support independent device timing. But it makes good sense to configure devices as per the article. You never know - your mobo may have unadvertised capabilities! I had an old mobo (QDI Explorer ca '96) which had a USB channel on it I discovered by accident and activated for Win98. :)

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#17
January 26, 2006 at 22:51:45

"Thanks guys i guess i'll go get a new power supply and try that and i'll test my old 512 stick of ram in my mom computer if i ever get over that way."

You could try a used PS first.
If your mom's computer mboard is about the same age as your old mboard, your old ram is more likely to work, but if it doesn't work or doesn't work properly, that still doesn't nessarily mean it is bad.

The place where I buy many of my computer parts assemble custom computer packages all the time. They tell me you don't need more than a 350watt good quality PS with current mboards unless you have enhanced PCI slots - most of the systems they build have 350 watt Evermax supplies, on par with Antec, but a little less expensive here - they have had no problems with returns because of that.

""By its very nature, each IDE/ATA channel can only deal with one request, to one device, at a time."

"An ATA33 device will NOT cause an ATA100 device to slow to ATA33 speed...they will operate independently of each other."

I've understood that for a long time.

However, what drives you use where makes a lot less difference these days with current CD/DVD drives that it does with current hard drives, and do not think it would make a signifcant difference where the cd/dvd drives are positioned in the real world, as far as it actually affects the computer user. The data from the CD/DVD drive that is read is effectively cached to the ram and the hard drive before being transferred to the burner drive in any case.


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#18
February 9, 2006 at 00:47:29

Hello, I was looking for some help with my problem, and I stumbled on this page, if anyone could provide any insight, I'd be very grateful. I'm on an HP Pavilion 772n PC, It has a 200W power supply, an hp dvd writer dvd200i a compaq dvd rom drive and 80gb master HD and I swap slave hd's between a quantam fireball 40gb and a western digital 60gb. I have an ati radeon 8500 128 mb vid card, 512 mb RAM (two 256mb sticks). The compaq dvd rom, the slave hard drives, and the ati card are parts I've added. I installed the vid card right when I got the PC, back in '01. and have had no problems with it, despite the monitor being unplugged from it while the PC was turned on. I just installed the compaq DVD rom recently and have had no problems with PC functionality. So here's the problem, my PC completely shuts down during burning. and I don't mean reboots or black screens. I mean it powers down, and I can't turn it back on unless I switch the surge protectors power off for a few seconds, and then switch it back on. I unhooked the slave hard drive and tried to burn, thinking it might help it, if it was a power supply issue, but it did the same thing. I recently installed new firmware for the dvd200i, because I was getting a lot of write errors using Nero 7. after I installed the firmware, I burned a few DVD data disks, and everything went perfectly. then I left on a trip, and before I went I switched hard drives out to download some files while I was gone. When I got back I switched the hard drives back out and then I started having this problem, It also started just powering off like that while I was just surfing the web, not really using to much CPU power or anything. I've gotten it to stop doing that by unhooking the 60gb hard drive, but still when i have only the factor HD hooked up, it still does this. I'm thinking it's a power supply issue, but anyone with any insight that could help would be gretaly appreciated. Maybe it's just old and out of shape?(dumb hypothesis, but who knows?¿) anyways I was wondering if there was anything I could try to troubleshoot this(aside from reinstalling, unhooking drives etc etc)or pinpoint the actual problem before I resort to purchasing and installing a new power supply. the reason I find it so strange is because it doesn't reboot, It powers off and I can't turn it back on without reseting the surge protector that the PC is running off of. thank you to anyone who can help! - Deano

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#19
February 9, 2006 at 06:43:28

Deano, thanks for the detailed post. It appears you have a bad power supply for the following reasons:

1. The 200W power supply is likely underpowered for the extra duty (added hardware)and could have failed.

2. If your surge suppressor has to be reset, it suggests you have a high current draw, likely due to the failure of the PSU. Looks like it's doing it's job protecting your computer. Usually these things trip at 15A which is WAY more than what a 200W load should draw.

Get a larger PSU, say 400W plus and get one of good quality. I'm unsure if an aftermarket PSU will fit in your PC because of HP's box design.


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