computer crashed bad_POOL_CALLER

February 9, 2009 at 07:41:59
Specs: Windows XP
I keep getting a BAD_POOL_CALLER Blue screen
Stop: 0x000000c2 (0x00000003,0x81514020,0x819FE560,0x819FE520
I am a novice when it comes to fixing computer problems so please if you can give me detailed directions I would greatly appreciate it thanks in advance for all who try and help me

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#1
February 9, 2009 at 08:08:04
There are several causes for that error. Have you Googled it? What happened immediately preceding the issue?

I would just run a Repair of XP...saves time.

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#2
February 9, 2009 at 08:23:25
how do
i do that

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#3
February 9, 2009 at 08:24:51
Windows XP Stop Errors
http://kadaitcha.cx/xp/stop_error.h...

"0x000000C2 BAD_POOL_CALLER
Kernel-mode process or driver problem.

The Stop 0xC2 message indicates that a kernel-mode process or driver incorrectly attempted to perform memory operations in the following ways:
By allocating a memory pool size of zero bytes
By allocating a memory pool that does not exist
By attempting to free a memory pool that is already free
By allocating or freeing a memory pool at an IRQL that was too high
This Stop message is typically due to a faulty driver or software."

Did you install any software before this first happened?
E.g. installing video drivers, or installing them the wrong way, can cause this error.

Try these things.

If you have any bootable CD or DVD in a drive, remove it.

Repeatedly press F8 while booting, don't hold the key down, starting very early in the boot.
From the boot choices menu that appears...

- select Enable VGA mode
That mode loads everything normally, except it forces Windowsto use default VGA drivers rather than the specific video drivers that are loaded when you boot normally.
If that gets you to the desktop and you then do not get the error, your problem is related to the video drivers you load for the card when you boot normally.

- if that doesn't help, try
selecting Safe mode from the boot choices menu.
Safe mode doesn't load a lot of things that are loaded when you boot normally.
It uses default VGA video, and it doesn't load a lot of other things. If you then do not get the error, your problem is caused by something Safe mode is not loading, but it probably hasn't got anything to do with the video drivers that are loaded when you boot normally.

- if that doesn't help, try
selecting Last known good.... from the boot choices menu.
That loads the last copy of the registry that worked successfully.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 9, 2009 at 13:11:18
"I would just run a Repair of XP.."

Running what many call a Repair install of Windows (I prefer to call it a Repair Setup, because what it does is run Setup again without deleting the contents of the existing partition Windows was installed on) takes a little less time than Windows Setup originally did to run (less than a hour or so), but you must have a regular Windows CD or the equivalent to run it (you may not be able to run it from the CD(s) that came (come) with a brand name system, if it came with any), and an XP Repair Setup (Repair install) will (almost always) not harm your existing Windows installation, but it can only fix things Windows detects as wrong, and/or replace corrupted or missing Windows files that are on your original XP CD.

It can't fix things that are caused by things that are not on the Windows CD, it can't replace missing files that are not on the CD that have been deleted on the computer, or fix/replace corrupted or missing files that are not on the Windows CD, and it can't fix problems caused by you installing the wrong software or buggy software or installing software the wrong way, if it wasn't on the Windows CD.

If for your own curiosity you want to know how you do that...
How to do an XP Repair Setup (Repair install) , step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

In order to run a Repair Setup (Repair install), you need the Product Key, preferably the one that was used to install Windows initially, but it can be one for the same version as the one of your Windows installation.
In most cases you get it from the official Microsoft sticker on your computer case, or from the official Microsoft sticker that came with your Windows CD if it has not been stuck to the case, or if you can't find that or don't have that, you can use a program to find the Product Key your Windows installation is presently using, BEFORE you run the Repair Setup (Repair install) - e.g. search for: keyfinder, by Jelly Bean whatever (it also finds other Microsoft software keys) - BUT you must be able to load Windows in order to run such a program.


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