CMOS plastic clip broke

July 14, 2009 at 15:26:46
Specs: xp professional

Dell optiplex GX270...
I was needing to set the password and the jumper for whatever reason was not working.
I read you can remove the CMOS battery, I took it out and I wait a while to put back in when I put it in the PLASTIC piece (prong) broke off and now of course it will not stay in place.. So how can I fix this? is it easy to soldier on this mother board of the Dell
optiplex GX270..HELP

See More: CMOS plastic clip broke

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#1
July 14, 2009 at 16:55:47

The battery holder usually just has 2 solder joints. As long as you can safely remove the motherboard and have a soldering iron you shouldn't have a problem. Best to use some desoldering braid to mop up the solder so the holes aren't clogged.

There are different varieties of holders but most have the same spacing between the contacts which means an exact replacement shouldn't be necessary. So you can desolder one from a junked motherboard, or if you can't find one, I can probably send one.


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#2
July 14, 2009 at 17:13:54

Otherwise... Duct tape anyone? Sorry not laughing at you but for you.

WinXp Amd 64 3000 Msi Neo2 Platinuim 1 gig ddr 400. When we cast a pebble into a pond we should look past the first ripple.


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#3
July 14, 2009 at 17:39:50

Duct tape was a thought , however I knew impossible, how about turning back time!!!. I will try and look for a replacement if I fail to find I will come back to you...Daveincaps..
Do you have any idea why when I was trying to get into system setup I was getting a black screen every time I hit f2 or f 12.
I received this computer from a school district and I needed to get rid of the cmos password they had on there before I reloaded the operating system.(they wiped it out, except the cmos password).

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Related Solutions

#4
July 14, 2009 at 17:52:16

Been there done that.

Ductape Yeap! Not like it's a moving part.


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#5
July 14, 2009 at 18:56:31

Or hot melt glue.

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#6
July 14, 2009 at 19:23:31

"Or hot melt glue."

Good one.

Or a dab of 5 minute epoxy, but make sure it's fresh, or it will take a lot longer than that to set up .

You'd have to hold it down for a short time in both cases though.
.......

"...I was getting a black screen every time I hit f2 or f 12."

It's extremely unlikely that has anything to do with the bios, unless you flashed the bios with a different version and did not load bios defaults, or remove the battery, or move the clear cmos jumper after that (flashing the bios usually does not load the cmos settings that match the changed bios version).
In any case, you can almost always load bios defaults in the bios Setup, which does the same thing as removing the battery exept the time and date remain current, or you can often move a clear cmos jumper on the mboard, move it back, which does the same thing as removing the battery, which sets the time and date to defaults as well as the other bios settings.

It's much more likely you have a keyboard problem, e.g. keys are sticking in the down position, or you're starting to have a backlight or voltage inverter problem.
By any chance have you dropped the laptop, or have you spilled any liquid on it? If so, it doesn't matter whether it was running at the time or not, something could have been damaged.
Have you noticed an overall tint to the display lately sometimes? e.g. pink?
......

Unless this computer is more than about 10 years old, the password is likely NOT stored in the cmos in the bioschip on a laptop like it is on a desktop computer. It's stored on another chip on the mboard that cannot have the data on it erased by removing the power to it. You can find out whether a password can be removed in the Owner's manual or the Service manual for the model - Dell should have that on their site. If it can't be removed, you may be able to contact the school ditrict and get a hold of someone who would know the password.



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#7
July 14, 2009 at 19:44:45

The other option is checking dells site for the bios version and googling a bios password reset prog

WinXp Amd 64 3000 Msi Neo2 Platinuim 1 gig ddr 400. When we cast a pebble into a pond we should look past the first ripple.


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#8
July 14, 2009 at 19:54:39

Looky what I found! Lol. http://docs.us.dell.com/support/edo...

WinXp Amd 64 3000 Msi Neo2 Platinuim 1 gig ddr 400. When we cast a pebble into a pond we should look past the first ripple.


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#9
July 14, 2009 at 20:18:29

http://tomcat.yc.edu/servman/Deskto...

WinXp Amd 64 3000 Msi Neo2 Platinuim 1 gig ddr 400. When we cast a pebble into a pond we should look past the first ripple.


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#10
July 15, 2009 at 06:33:00

Reply to tubesanders.

The keyboard is brand new and I was working on this computer to give to my Dad, so all things were functioning with my other computer... this Dell computer is only 3 years old....my neighbor received the same computer but she had no problem, so I am going to go and try and replace the battery holder and try again.
Is it possible that the Monitor was not compatible with the computer? It showed the set up screen before it hands it over to OS (the F12, and F2 for the settings ) I was able to see that its after that it went blank....when I hit those or left alone it went blank, so that is why I took out the battery , so I could go forward and load the OS...


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#11
July 15, 2009 at 07:55:03

Oops - so this isn't a laptop.
In that case, clearing the cmos by moving a jumper and moving it back, or removing the battery, will probably remove the password.

"It showed the set up screen before it hands it over to OS (the F12, and F2 for the settings ) I was able to see that its after that it went blank....when I hit those or left alone it went blank"

If you mean the display turned black once the operating system was loading....
I've had this happen several times.
Sometimes that happens when the specific drivers loaded for the video don't detect the monitor properly, and when they don't, sometimes nothing is displayed. Windows loads fine otherwise - you can see the hd activity led blinking as it normally does.
That can also happen if you have set your Display settings for one monitor, then changed which monitor you have plugged in. E.g. a CRT monitor is often capable of being set to settings most LCD monitors cannot display.
Also, that may happen the first time you boot after the computer has been shut down, if the monitor was not powered on for a least a few seconds before you booted the computer, but in that case you will have video in Windows the next time you boot.
(If you have no video in Windows, if your desktop screen loads without you needing to enter a Logon password, when there is no more hd activity, press Alt-Ctrl-Del, then Alt-U, then U to shut down Windows normally.)

Boot the computer into Enable VGA mode and load drivers for the monitor.

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs you have in drives.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, and when you see the boot choices menu, choose Enable VGA mode.
Enable VGA mode loads everything normal mode does except it forces Windows to use default VGA drivers that all monitors and video adapters support rather than the specific video drivers loaded in normal mode.
When the desktop has loaded, the display will likely have fewer colors, the resolution will be lower and the icons will be larger.
RIGHT click on a blank area of the desktop screen, choose Properties (goes to Display Propertities).
Choose Settings - the Advanced button - Monitor tab - Properties - Driver tab - Update driver
No, not at this time, Next
Install from a list..., Next
Don't Search....., Next
Choose Plug and Play Monitor
OR - if you have the drivers for the specific monitor, choose Have Disk, and browse to where the drivers are, and load them.
Save settings, reboot the computer normally, you should have video after Windows starts to load.

NOTE that XP's Plug and Play Monitor drivers have probably not changed at all since Windows XP was first released.
If you have specific drivers for your monitor, or if you can get them from the manufacturer's web site, you are much better off loading them instead of Plug and Play Monitor drivers, especially if you are using an LCD (or Plasma) monitor, because you can choose settings in Plug and Play Monitor mode that can DAMAGE an LCD (or Plasma) monitor.
El-cheapo LCD monitor makes/models (e.g. Acer) may not have any specific drivers available for them, but better models do (e.g. Samsung, LG, Viewsonic). If you have the CD that came with the monitor, there may be an installation prgram that installs the monitor drivers on it, or there may not be, and you have to use Have Disk at the above mentioned location to point to where the drivers are on the CD when you change monitor drivers - Windows requires you find the location of the *.inf file for the drivers - it may be in a folder or a subfolder on the CD, not in the root folder. Or you may be able to get a drivers download for your model from the manufacturer's web site, and use that.
If you can load specific monitor drivers, Windows by default only shows you the settings that both the monitor and the video drivers support - it is NOT recommended you disable that when you have an LCD (or Plasma) monitor, because it is possible you could choose a setting that will DAMAGE your monitor.
.........

Why Enable VGA mode?

Safe Mode also loads default VGA drivers, but it also doesn't load a lot of other things that are loaded in normal mode.
You can't change Monitor drivers in the Display Properties in Safe Mode.

If Enable VGA mode works, normal mode doesn't, as far as this problem is concerned, no monitor drivers are being loaded in normal mode, or monitor drivers are being loaded but the monitor can't display because the settings are wrong for the monitor model, or if you have other video problems or problems after installing video related software your problem is probably caused by something to do with your specific video drivers.

If Enable VGA mode doesn't work, whatever your problem is, is probably not caused by something to do with your specific video drivers or monitor drivers or lack of monitor drivers - something else is wrong.

If Enable VGA mode doesn't work, normal mode doesn't work properly, but Safe mode does, whatever it is that was wrong is probably not caused by something to do with your specific video drivers or monitor drivers or lack of monitor drivers, and it's something Safe mode doesn't load that normal mode does.

If you need to un-install video drivers or other drivers or software because it/they are the wrong one(s) or for whatever reason normal mode won't work properly because of some software that was loaded , sometimes some things, e.g. video drivers, cannot be un-installed in Safe mode, but if the computer will boot into Enable VGA mode, you can un-install anything you can normally un-install in normal mode.


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#12
July 15, 2009 at 09:36:36

ok I will try the F8 and enable VGA mode(sounds like a possible culprit), but after I fix the stupid holder for the CMOS battery.. wish me luck...

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