CMOS Battery Low problems

January 25, 2011 at 16:06:35
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit, AMD Sempron 768mb RAM
Hi!

Whenever I try to boot into my OS, I get an error message saying CMOS Battery Low, then I get a screen with a flashing hyphen. The OS will not boot at all. I have tried many different battery and many new ones, and I get the same problem.

Any tips?

Comguy

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#1
January 25, 2011 at 16:13:26
When you replaced the battery did you go into the BIOS and check the settings ans save them?

You need to do this as when the battery failed. When the battery first failed the CMOS memory will have been corrupted and will stay corrupted until new information is written to it.

Stuart


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#2
January 25, 2011 at 16:44:16
How do I do that on the BIOS for a AMD Sempron ASUS Motherboard?

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#3
January 25, 2011 at 17:04:38
Press Delete and keep tapping it as soon as the computer start up. If that doesn't work try Insert.

Stuart


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Related Solutions

#4
January 25, 2011 at 17:11:26
Yeah, I can get to the BIOS, but I don't know which settings to reset, and I don't think there is a factory reset.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#5
January 25, 2011 at 17:50:47
There isn't a factory reset. But there will be fail safe defaults or optimum settings. You will need to check the date and time as well as the hard disk configuration is correct. Then save the settings.

Stuart


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#6
January 26, 2011 at 05:25:35
Post the model number of your board, the model of your Sempron, the type/speed of RAM you're running. I'll see if I can provide a list of BIOS settings for you.

Are those specs correct? Win7 64-bit with only 768MB RAM? The minimum recommended RAM for the 64-bit version is 2GB. I can't imagine it performs very well on your system. You should upgrade your RAM to at least 2GB or go back to XP.


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#7
January 27, 2011 at 12:32:12
To be honest, it works excellent, the RAM is DDR 333 RAM, I'll get the other specs for you.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#8
January 27, 2011 at 14:36:27
Alright, the processor is a AMD Sempron 2600+, the clock is 1612MHZ and the count is 1. Tell me if you need any other info. P.S I don't know where to find the board's model #.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#9
January 27, 2011 at 15:11:45
"Whenever I try to boot into my OS, I get an error message saying CMOS Battery Low, then I get a screen with a flashing hyphen. The OS will not boot at all."

The Cmos Battery Low message probably has nothing to do with your other problem.
The operating system should load fine even when the cmos battery is dead or is not installed, however some programs will not work correctly unless the Time and Date are correct in Windows.
.......

"I have tried many different battery and many new ones, and I get the same problem."

The + on the top of the battery must be visible when it is installed in it's socket, otherwise it's polarity is backwards and the bios behaves as if the battery is dead or too weak.

The top contact on the battery socket must touch the top of the battery - if it doesn't remove the battery, bend the contact downwards, install the battery again the correct way.

Check for corrosion in the socket or on the underside of the top contact - scrape that off if you see that, and usually a bit of household vinegar will get rid of the rest of it.

If the clear cmos jumper on the mboard is not in the normal or run position, you may get false messages from the bios.


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#10
January 28, 2011 at 04:27:45
Okay. It's running, I don't know how but it's running. It still has the screen with the flashing hyphen, when it shows that the hyphen moves down a little, if I reset and it goes back to that screen, it will move a little then disappear, then Windows will boot.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#11
January 28, 2011 at 08:17:12
Is the "error message saying CMOS Battery Low " no longer appearing ?

I don't have Windows 7 installed on any of my computers, but I do have Vista Home Premium installed on one and most things in Vista are identical to the same things in Windows 7.

I briefly see a flashing hyphen top left on a black screen just after the bios's POST completes before the Vista operating system starts to load - that's normal - but the operating system loads no problem after that.

If that flashing hyphen top left on a black screen happens for a longer time, then the operating system loads fine, or if the flashing hyphen top left on a black screen stays on the screen and the operating system doesn't load after that, intermittently, then you may have a minor hardware problem, or a problem with something that normally loads in the operating system before you see any indication of that on the screen.

If that's caused by a minor hardware issue, it may be caused by...

- a poor connection of the ram in it's slot(s)

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

- There is a poor connection inside your case somewhere.

Unplug the case/power supply, or switch off the AC power to it otherwise.
Power off your monitor.
Open up the case by removing the left side panel as seen when you're looking at the front of the case.
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle.

Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.

Check your IDE data cables if that applies.

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.
......................

A problem with something that normally loads in the operating system before you see any indication of that on the screen is harder to determine.

E.g. that may happen if your computer is having problems with establishing a network connection, especially if the connection is wireless.



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#12
February 2, 2011 at 00:37:32
when i boot os then appear error message cmos battery low and then i change a new battery then problem was solved but half month later same problem is display on the screen. this problem attack two time, i solved this problem but no success for long time.

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#13
February 2, 2011 at 06:45:11
Rupam

See response 9.

Did you use a new battery, not just another battery you had ?

New batteries normally last years - e.g. a CR2032 will typically last about 5 years or more.


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#14
February 11, 2011 at 13:23:05
Yes, the error message no longer appears, although I am having another problem... check my other messages if you think you can help...

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#15
February 11, 2011 at 13:44:41
What was it that you did or discovered that fixed the problem ?

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#16
February 11, 2011 at 13:56:02
Nothing. It just started working. Although now I'm having problems with my PSU.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#17
February 11, 2011 at 14:44:53
What is the make and model of your PS ?
What is it's max total (output) wattage capacity ?

What video card(s) do you have installed in a mboard slot, if that applies?


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#18
February 11, 2011 at 19:14:39
Acepower 400W PSU, in the AGP slot I have a NVidia GeForce 6300.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#19
February 11, 2011 at 21:57:02
There's no such thing as Geforce 6300.

Minimum recommended power supply capacity:

Geforce 6200 - 300 watts
Geforce 6600 - 350 watts
Geforce 6800 GS - 420 watts

Your Acepower 400W PS
It appears it's decent quality.
There are two current lines, and possibly several other older lines, that have a 400 watt capacity model.
The only one on their web site they have info about is
Model FP- 400W
http://www.ace-power.com.tw/product...

I could not find any info on their web site about how long the warranty is - if you have a manual or docs that came with it the warranty may be stated in that - when I search on the web, apparently at least some of their models have a Lifetime Warranty.

If you have a Geforce 6800 GS - 420 watts rec.- , you are at risk of constantly overloading the power supply.
If you have a Geforce 6600 - 350 watts rec - you are at risk of slightly overloading the power supply.
If you have a Geforce 6200 - 300 watts rec., your power supply should handle that, no problem.

If you have the FP-400W model, it's rated to be 80% efficient or a little more. That indicates in can run at 80% capacity constantly.
400 x .8 = 320 watts
Most power supply capacity ratings are intermittant ratings, unless the label states xxx watts continuous, which is rare, so 320 watts is probably close to the max continuous rating.
If you have some other model, it's probably less efficient.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

If you are frequently placing a high load on the power supply, if it doesn't have enough capacity to handle the constant load, it usually works fine for a while anyway but it's slowly being damaged.

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
Check the voltages in the bios.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

Even if you don't see anything wrong with those 3 voltages in the bios, you can't rule out the power supply being defective until you have tried another known good power supply.

If you can connect another power supply you have or that a friend has that has, say, at least 500 watts capacity if you have the 6800 GS, try that.



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#20
February 11, 2011 at 22:10:16
I do apologize, it is a NVidia GeForce 6200, I have the computer running on a non-SATA PSU right now. Its working good but luckily my OS is on my 120GB IDE as I cannot use my SATA HDD's.

"There are two ways of doing this. My way, or the he's a dead motherf#$%*@ way. You pick." - The Boss, Conker's Bad Fur Day


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#21
February 11, 2011 at 22:22:00
"I cannot use my SATA HDD's."

What's the problem ?
You can buy molex to SATA power wiring adapters and use SATA drives with any power supply.

If you are using one and they're not being recognized, are you SURE they're spinning ?

NOTE that most power supplies these days have two +12v max output amperage ratings listed on their label. In that case, +12v power is sourced from two separate sections on the board inside the power supply.
There was a guy who posted here a short while ago - it turned out one of those two +12v sections was producing no power on a brand new power supply - the drives were not getting +12v and were not spinning, yet the mboard and fans which both use +12v worked fine, and the USB ports which use only +5v worked fine..


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