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Solved CD/DVD Drive wont read disks

November 5, 2011 at 18:44:05
Specs: Windows 7, Intel Core i7 / 1.60Ghz / 4Gb RAM

My Cd/DVD Drive has ceased reading disks. It will make a sound as if it's constantly trying to boot up, but with no success. The issue it's having is the same as described in another persons problem.
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

But I don't know if it's because my setup is different, or it's just that this post was made in 2005, but I'm having no luck with trying to fix it.

The computer I'm using is an ASUS Notebook N61Jq.

Big thanks in advanced for any help with resolving this issue.


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✔ Best Answer
November 8, 2011 at 06:54:02

"...one moment it was playing a DVD fine, then it became incapable of reading and playing the rest..."

You tried other DVDs after that I assume. Have you tried CDs ?
Maybe it has the one laser or it's circuitry is malfunctioning problem - that's probably the number two most frequent reason for optical drive failiure.

You specify your os as Windows 7- assuming that's what the notebook has, that would indicate your notebook isn't all that old, but if you have used the optical drive a lot, it could still have gotten enough use for either thing to be your case.

"...my area is prone to its power outs..."

You should get yourself an anti-power surge / voltage spike device to plug your AC adapter into in that case. Some made for use with laptops are quite small, designed to be portable - e.g. Tripplite makes at least one of those. Or, if you don't move it elsewhere much, using a UPS. which also has that protection, would be wise.
If it was damaged by a power surge or a voltage spike, you don't necessarily get symptoms immediately after that.



#1
November 5, 2011 at 22:38:51

Optical drives themselves don't boot - they just spin, or don't spin.

The most common reason a disk with data on it that drive can read in an optical (CD or DVD) drive fails to be recognized properly by the bios while booting and Windows after the drive has been used a lot is it can no longer spin a disk at the minimum 1X legacy audio CD speed because it's cheap sleeve bearings on the motor have deteriorated to the point there is too much friction in them.
You're probably hearing the drive attempting to spin fast enough for the minimum speed or faster, but it can no longer do that. Typically it trys a few times, then no longer trys, until you eject the drive tray and retract it, then it will try again.

Buy yourself a replacement drive on the web.

E.g. search for: Asus N61Jq DVD drive
.........

Note that your Boot Order or similar settings in the bios Setup must be set correctty to boot from an optical drive,
See Response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
or you must press a specific key while booting and select an optical drive to boot from, in order for the bios to boot the computer from a bootable disk in an optical drive.

However if a disk with data on it that drive can read is not recognized at all in Windows itself, the most likely thing is the motor bearings are producing too much friction
.........

That guy in that topic you found

http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

probably has desktop computer. The solution worked for him but that's probably not what your problem is.
In his case, his bios must have been able to recognize a disk in the drive properly otherwise the solution would not have worked. You don't normally get the lines in the Registry mentioned in the topic that Windows inserts when it detects a problem with the optical drive on a laptop. On a desktop computer that situation is usually directly related to there having been a poor data cable connection that caused Windows to insert those lines. Laptops don't have data cables for the drives - they have direct connections If you do have those lines in the Registry the drive is probably defective and needs to be replaced in any case.

If the bios does not recognize a bootable disk in the drive while booting when the bios has been set correctly to boot from an optical drive - you should see "Press a key to boot from CD" or similar while booting if it does - the only thing that can cause that is the drive has a problem, most likely the bearings have too much friction.
.....

Another less likely thing that can happen is one of the lasers or it's assocated circuitry has malfunctioned after the drive has been used a lot. DVD drives have at least two lasers - all DVD drives can read CDs. If one laser or it's assocated circuitry has malfunctioned, the other one usually still works. It will either read CDs fine but not DVDs, or read DVDs fine but not CDs - it still needs to be replaced.


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#2
November 6, 2011 at 06:55:14

Here's a better explanation of the solution mentioned at that topic you found.

You can fix the problem automatically.

If that doesn't work, you must replace the DVD drive.

Your CD drive or DVD drive is missing or is not recognized by Windows or other programs
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/982116


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#3
November 7, 2011 at 03:30:55

Alright, looks like there's no choice but to get it replaced then and use an external in the mean time if I can find one.

Thank you for the quick reply to my problem. :)


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Related Solutions

#4
November 7, 2011 at 06:54:13

Thanks for the thank you.

By the way, I was assuming none of these things apply:

Have you, or is it possible someone else who had access to this computer...
- dropped it, or dropped anything on it, or otherwise exposed it to a physical jolt ?
- spilled liquid on it, or sprayed it with liquid, or exposed it to liquid such as rain ?

Since the video last worked properly all the time, has there been a power failure event that happened while the AC adapter was plugged in ?

Those things are the most frequent reasons something inside the laptop has been damaged.
.......


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#5
November 8, 2011 at 01:24:12

As for anything ever being spilt or dropped on it, that's never happened, thankfully.

But my area is prone to its power outs, and I do leave my laptop plugged in frequently while it's busy rendering.
I would not be surprised for you or another to point that out as a cause of it to stop working, but I think something just really went wrong the last time there was a disk in use, as one moment it was playing a DVD fine, then it became incapable of reading and playing the rest.
But that could still have to do with a prior issue, I'm guessing?


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#6
November 8, 2011 at 06:54:02
✔ Best Answer

"...one moment it was playing a DVD fine, then it became incapable of reading and playing the rest..."

You tried other DVDs after that I assume. Have you tried CDs ?
Maybe it has the one laser or it's circuitry is malfunctioning problem - that's probably the number two most frequent reason for optical drive failiure.

You specify your os as Windows 7- assuming that's what the notebook has, that would indicate your notebook isn't all that old, but if you have used the optical drive a lot, it could still have gotten enough use for either thing to be your case.

"...my area is prone to its power outs..."

You should get yourself an anti-power surge / voltage spike device to plug your AC adapter into in that case. Some made for use with laptops are quite small, designed to be portable - e.g. Tripplite makes at least one of those. Or, if you don't move it elsewhere much, using a UPS. which also has that protection, would be wise.
If it was damaged by a power surge or a voltage spike, you don't necessarily get symptoms immediately after that.


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#7
November 11, 2011 at 21:32:51

Yes, I'd tested it out with both types over time. Even desperately hoped it'd be nice and work one time for burning a disk.

The off thing is that I hardly ever did make use of my drive. Most anything I've done is via an external, and the only times a disk was used was to burn something and the rare installation. So I'm thinking it's defiantly related to a power surge. Normally everything I have is plugged into a surge protector, but perhaps with how odd the power can get, with flicking on, then off, then on, etc in a very quick succession, what I had isn't enough. Or it was an odd night when AC just wasn't plugged into one.

I'll be looking into Tripplite.

Again, I thank you for the help. :)


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#8
November 12, 2011 at 07:50:16

The optical drive is spinning more often than you may be aware of.

If a disk is in the drive while booting, depending on settings in your bios Setup Boot Order or similar settings and/or your bios version, the bios may spin the disk, every time you boot the computer.

If a disk is in the drive while loading Windows, Windows always spins it when Windows first loads, and no matter when you insert a disk it also spins it when you do certain things and it "thinks" you might want to access the disk - when it does the latter it often doesn't spin the disk at the max speed so it doesn't make much noise, and the led on the front of the drive does NOT always go on when it does that.

So - it's wise to remove any disk you're not presently using to reduce the amount of time the drive is spinning and to lengthen the useful life of the drive due to there being less wear in it's motor's bearings.


Tripplite portable suppressors
http://www.tripplite.com/en/product...


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