Can a mobo or other part of PC kill a PSU?

December 11, 2010 at 06:32:05
Specs: Windows XP, AMD Athlon 64 X2 4000+/2 GB
Hi,
I replaced a dead PSU but a new one lived only 2 days. What could kill it? Mobo, or sth else? There wasn't any visible problems with electricity at the apartment. What is most probable? How probable is that the replacement PSU was somewhat oddly, invisibly bad? Anybody had such experience like mine? Till now I thought that only PSU could kill other parts.
TIA
sonda

See More: Can a mobo or other part of PC kill a PSU?

Report •


#1
December 11, 2010 at 06:41:23
Post the psu specs, how much did u pay for a new psu?
how did u know the new psu bad?
We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires piece prepare for war - PROPHET.

Report •

#2
December 11, 2010 at 07:09:31
The new one was 600 Watts (+12v more than 500W). The previous one was much weaker - overall wattage 400 W and +12v line only 180 W. However, the old one was able to serve for 3 years. Neither was a big brand.

Report •

#3
December 11, 2010 at 07:15:06
Possibilities:
1. Bad luck, you bought a PSU with a latent fault.
2. PSU rating too low, it cannot handle the load. Under spec PSU.
3. Some PSUs have independent rails. Did they all die?
4. Do you have other devices (e.g. Graphics) that require PSU input? If so are they taking too much load. Again pointing to under spec PSU.
5. A fault on attached device/s that is not quite a short but taking an unduly large load.

From your second post, under spec is unlikely so look at the other causes.

___________________________________________
When everything else fails, read the instructions.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 11, 2010 at 07:45:06
Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

You should be able to return a PS that died after only 2 days and get a replacement or a refund, unless it was so cheap it has no warranty at all.

A decent 600 watt PS will be enough or more than enough to handle a system with one of any current video chipset on a video card in a mboard slot , even a high end one.
.......

Did you do anything else when you replaced the PS or since then ?
E.g. installing ram that is not compatible with using it in your mboard, or installing ram backwards in a slot, or ram having a poor connection in it's slot, or the video card or another card not being all the way down in it's slot, can all cause your system to not boot normally.
The cpu fan not spinning, or the cpu fan wiring not being connected to the cpu fan header, will often cause the mboard to shut off the computer in as little as 5 seconds after you attempt to boot.
......

Unlikely....

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

This was the original bad capacitor problem - has some example pictures.
History of why the exploding capacitors and which mboard makers were affected:
http://members.datafast.net.au/~dft...

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, Athlon cpu's, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...


Report •

#5
December 11, 2010 at 07:53:26
"The new one was 600 Watts (+12v more than 500W). The previous one was much weaker - overall wattage 400 W and +12v line only 180 W. However, the old one was able to serve for 3 years"

Those ratings mean nothing. Manufacturer's tend to exaggerate the wattage ratings, especially the no-name "neither was a big brand" manufacturers. Amperage is what's important, plus the PSU needs to be made out of good quality internal components. A quality PSU is heavy. Many times you can tell the difference between a good & bad one just by holding it in your hand.

One trick the low end brands use is to load up the amperage on the +3.3v & +5v rails. There's no need to have more than 30A. Since there are very few components that use these rails, 20A is usually adequate. If these rails are rated significantly higher than 30A, it means the usable wattage for the PSU is much lower than advertised.

We can't help you if you're not going to post detailed info about your hardware.


Report •

#6
December 12, 2010 at 13:05:37
Thx for responses.
This computer is based on Gigabyte M61SME-S2. Processor: Athlon 64 X2 4000+ (Brisbane, stepping 1). Built-in graphics nvidia 6100 in use only. One HDD, one DVD burner, 1 NIC, 2 sticks of 1 GB of DDR2, 1 laser printer.
I returned the dead PS and received the same but I was afraid to put it in, so I put in another one, used, comparable to the first one. I want to check if this one also dies prematurely before exposing to danger the new one.
I wasn't able to recognize any bad caps.
In the event viewer there were errors: Driver found cotroller error on Device\Harddisk0\D
With bluescreenview I discovered a few minidumps related to nvidia driver. Interestingly the user didn't report any BSODs but only strange freezes when watching online videos, accomapnied by some noise from the inside of the computer. Strange. SATA host adapter and graphics card are within north bridge, so, maybe NB is faulty here?

Report •

#7
December 12, 2010 at 15:15:29
PSs can damage the mboard or anything connected to the mboard while failing or when they have failed fail completely. The more el-cheapo the PS is, the more likely that it will damage something else while failing.

If the drive controller error is for a connection to an actual drive, try disconnecting the data cable connection to the drive at the mboard SATA header, or at the drive end if it's IDE, try the computer with the drive disconnected that way if possible, and/or check the data cables.

Check the data cables and the pins on the drive at both ends for evidence of damage. For that matter, check all wiring connections and drive pins and the contacts on cards in slots and on the ram modules in their slots for evidence of damage.

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.


Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.


You could try un-installing the NVidia "drivers" and installing them again.

Sound and video "drivers" always have associated files that must be installed properly along with the actual drivers. If you install only the actual drivers, it's likely the device will NOT work properly.

Unless the instructions for installing a device tell you otherwise....
(this ALWAYS applies to video and sound adapters )

You DO NOT install drivers for a device while booting into Windows, if the software for the device has not been installed yet - when Windows detects a generic device or New Hardware while booting, you allow it to search for drivers, it doesn't find any, and it wants you to show it the location of the drivers - CANCEL that, continue on to the desktop, and install the software for the device using the proper installation from a CD or the proper installation file that you downloaded from the web.
The same applies no matter when Windows finds New Hardware !

If you DID install drivers that way,

(The following also applies if you want to un-install previous software, or re-install the same software)

- for video "drivers"....

- go to Control Panel - Classic View - Add/Remove Programs and Un-install the software you installed, reboot, DO NOT install drivers while booting, let the desktop screen fully load.

Install the video software properly by running the proper download you got from the web, or if you have the CD that came with the video card that's in a slot, or if you have the CD that came with the brand name computer that has the Drivers on it, run the video software installation from the installation program on that.

for sound adapter drivers...

- go to Control Panel - Classic View - Add/Remove Programs and Un-install the software you installed, reboot, DO NOT install drivers while booting.

- go to Device Manager.
(e.g. RIGHT click on My Computer - Properties - Hardware - Device Manager)
If the sound adapter is still listed, RIGHT click on it and Un-install it.
If that was there, and you un-installed it, Reboot at least once.
DO NOT install drivers while booting.

Install the sound software properly by running the proper download you got from the web, or if you have the CD that came with the sound card, or if you have the CD that came with the brand name computer that has the Drivers on it, run the sound software installation from the installation program on that.



Report •

#8
December 13, 2010 at 09:17:37
Thx for your detailed post. I have been reading a lot recently about how PSU can fail and found some opinions that too powerful PSU can be problematic ("using a too powerful PSU is not a really good idea. Actually very low load is more harmful to modern switching units than heavy load", hardwareheaven.com). In my case PSU was 600 W and calculated, recommended wattage was 218 W. What do you think?
TIA

Report •

#9
December 13, 2010 at 22:13:52
"Actually very low load is more harmful to modern switching units than heavy load"

That's B.S. in my opinion !!!

All computer power supplies are switching power supplies.
There is no conventional transformer in the PS for producing the AC voltage that becomes +12v D.C. - the AC voltage for that is provided by the switching function of an IC on the board inside the PS. There are conventional transformers on the board for reducing that AC voltage for what becomes +5v and +3.3v D.C. .

You must have at least a minimal load on a computer power supply - e.g. at least the mboard with no ram in it with the cpu installed, otherwise the PS won't start up, but other than that, I have never seen any evidence that the PS having more capacity than you need does any harm to the mboard or the PS.

There is lots of WRONG info on web.
At least when you post here, some who answer frequently here supply the correct info.


Report •


Ask Question