Building a PC - About Motherboards & CPUs

Macally Securityman motion/audio sensor...
December 26, 2009 at 19:23:49
Specs: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit, TBD
I'm building a new PC. I've got about $800 to $1k to spend. This computer will be used primarily for video editing and some graphic design, but heck, if it happens to be able to play a game or two... hehehehe.
Anyway, I've got this case I'm 90% sure I'm going to buy in the next day or so. ( http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/Produ... )
My question is, what kind of motherboard would fit with it? A relative told me to go with AMD motherboards but when I shop online I see questions asking about what "socket type" I want, and I'm not sure what that means. I'm assuming that's where the CPU is plugged.

Also, I was told to go quad-core or at least dual-core. My question is this, if I see something that says 1.33ghz Quad-Core, does that mean all 4 CPUs working together pulls together to perform at the equivalent of one CPU going at 1.33ghz? Or does that mean each CPU is going at 1.33ghz?
Assuming my budget for a CPU was $150 - $300 (preferably way cheaper than $300), what kind of Quad-Core do you think would be in my range?


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#1
December 26, 2009 at 19:50:27
"questions asking about what "socket type" I want, and I'm not sure what that means. I'm assuming that's where the CPU is plugged." Yes, there are different socket types for both AMD based and Intel based motherboards. If you don't know about that, then I'm not sure that you're ready to build your own computer yet. Of course you have to learn sometime, but you might be better off, at least for the first time, buying a motherboard/cpu combo, where the cpu and heat sink/fan are preinstalled for you. I'm not sure why your relative wanted you to buy an AMD based motherboard, but there's no reason not to buy an Intel based motherboard.

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#2
December 26, 2009 at 20:01:06
I've already built my own PC, but that was about 10 years ago but the Motherboard and CPU came together. This time I want to do it right, just ... no experience with selecting a Motherboard alone.

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#3
December 26, 2009 at 20:01:26
"My question is, what kind of motherboard would fit with it?"

Try reading the specs, it tells you exactly what types of boards fit.

"I see questions asking about what "socket type" I want, and I'm not sure what that means"

If you don't know that, you're no where near ready to build your own PC.

"if I see something that says 1.33ghz Quad-Core, does that mean all 4 CPUs working together pulls together to perform at the equivalent of one CPU going at 1.33ghz? Or does that mean each CPU is going at 1.33ghz?"

Same answer as above...you're not ready. There is no crash course. There's no way we can explain everything there is to know about hardware...you have to do your homework. I suggest you do a LOT of reading.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 27, 2009 at 06:28:55
You might want to look at:
http://www.kitchentablecomputers.co...
That site might be a little outdated.
A google search should bring up many other such websites.

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#5
December 27, 2009 at 10:32:16
But what about the children?

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#6
December 27, 2009 at 12:24:08
"But what about the children"?

Let them do the research.

I agree you need to get up to speed BEFORE buying anything. If you plan on sitting in front of your computer for any length of time that case will be annoying. Lots of fans means lots of noise. Lights and gimmicks don't make a reliable fast computer.

You do realize there is no power supply included with that case. Pricey if you ask me.

The case is the last thing you should be deciding on anyway.

Full towers will accept ATX or mATX motherboards. Those letters represent the form factor of the board. Has nothing to do with the brand of the CPU or the socket type.

Google for all the terms you hear and look for Wikipedia threads.


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