Boot rom check sum error

PM8M3-V
April 4, 2008 at 05:36:11
Specs: WINDOWSXP, 512
I HAVE A
PM8M3-V MOTHER BOARD,
512 RAM,
PENTIUM 4, 2.2MGHZ

I INSTALLED NEW DRIVERS WITH LIVE BIOS UPDATE ON THE MSI SITE AND THE COMPUTER GAVE ME ERROR 21 AND COULD NOT UNPATE THE DRIVERS, THEN I TRIED TO UPDATE AGAIN THEN IT TOLD ME IT COULD NOT GET FLACH UTILITY AND COULD NOT UPDATE ALL BIOS BLOCKS. WHEN I POWERD UP AGAIN IT GAVE ME THIS MESSAGE
BOOT ROM CHECK SUM ERROR
DETECTING FLOPPY DRIVE A MEDIA.....
THERE IS NO FLOPPY CONNECTED TO THE COMPUTER AND WHEN I BOUGHT THERE WAS NO FLOPPY AT ALL.


See More: Boot rom check sum error

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#1
April 4, 2008 at 05:45:53
Unfortunately, I think that your BIOS may be corrupted. Why did you try to update the BIOS ? You shouldn't do that unless you have a good reason. In addition, it is better to update the BIOS by booting to a floppy rather than on a website or from within Windows. If the BIOS chip is not soldered to the motherboard, then you can try to get a replacement chip. Otherwise, you may have to RMA the board to MSI if it's still under warranty.

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#2
April 4, 2008 at 05:51:23
BTW please refrain from using all caps. Your post is hard to read and is tantamount to shouting in forums.

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#3
April 4, 2008 at 13:24:52
You either flashed using the wrong update, or you interrupted the flash process before it was finished, or something went wrong during flashing because your Windows was not working as it should at the time.

"BOOT ROM CHECK SUM ERROR
DETECTING FLOPPY DRIVE A MEDIA....."

That shows the boot block part of the bios is booting the computer.
The boot block is there so that you can attempt to recover your bios if something goes wrong while flashing the bios. That part of the bios does not normally need to be flashed when you update the bios version - it usually stays the same after the original bios version for your particular mboard model. The default for most bios flashes is that part is not flashed when you update the bios.
It has minimal capabilities and can only do a few things.
It is looking for a floppy disk in the A floppy drive that has certain files on it with which you can attempt to recover your bios.

The first thing you need to do is make sure you used the proper bios update.

There are three different PCB board versions of your model.
The PCB board version is printed directly on the mboard.
E.g. on this MSI mboard probably as Ver or Rev 1.0, 3.0 or 4.1 right beside the model number, which is usually in obvious larger characters between the PCI slots .
Which bios version you use depends on which PCB mboard version you have.

http://global.msi.com.tw/index.php?...

I haven't used either version of the MSI Live Update so I don't know what you saw or whether or not it gave you the choice of more than one bios version to upgrade to.
If it did give you more than one choice based on the PCB number/mboard Ver or Rev number, you must choose the right one.
If you chose the wrong one there's a strong chance that's why the flash failed.
If there was only one choice, you probably interrupted the flash process before it was finished, or something went wrong during flashing because your Windows was not working as it should at the time.

"THERE IS NO FLOPPY CONNECTED TO THE COMPUTER AND WHEN I BOUGHT THERE WAS NO FLOPPY AT ALL."

You have a floppy header on your mboard.
You MUST connect a floppy drive to the header and have a floppy in it that has the right files on it if you want to be able to attempt to recover your bios yourself!

From the MSI tshooting info on their web site:


"BIOS flash failed during BIOS update
Try BIOS recovery for AMI or Award BIOS

AMI BIOS recovery procedure
• Rename the desired AMI BIOS file to AMIBOOT.ROM and save it on a floppy disk. e.g. Rename A6712VMS.190 to AMIBOOT.ROM
• Insert this floppy disk in the floppy drive. Turn On the system and press and hold Ctrl-Home to force update. It will read the AMIBOOT.ROM file and recover the BIOS from the A drive.
• When 4 beeps are heard you may remove the floppy disk and restart the computer.

Award BIOS recovery procedure
• Make a bootable floppy disk
• Copy the Award flash utility files & bios file to the bootable floppy diskette
• Open Notepad and put the following command line e.g. awdfl826B w6777NMS.140 than save to the floppy drive and name as Autoexec.bat
• Restart system with the floppy diskette that contains the Award utility & bios file (it will take less than 2 minutes before screen comes out)"

Where do you get the update file and the proper flash utility?
I'm not sure.
It used to be you could download both of them manually for your particular model and use a bootable Dos floppy and a Dos flash procedure as well as using Live Update on the MSI sites.
Perhaps one or the other Live Update version also downloads those files.

If you don't want to try the Recovery procedure yourself, take it to some computer place that works on computer problems and they will attempt to do it for you.

There is very real possibilty the flash chip physically failed while flashing and that's the reason the flash failed, although usually if the boot block boots the computer the bios chip is okay.

In the manual for your mboard it shows the bios chip is in a socket on the mboard. However, the manual is version 1.2, you may actually have a different PCB version, and I have previously discovered some PCB versions of some MSI mboards have the bios chip soldered directly to the mboard.

If the flash chip has physically failed and cannot be successfully flashed, or if you just want to get this situation fixed, if the bios chip is in a socket, you can buy a replacment bios chip that is already flashed with the mboard maker's latest update on the web, and replace the bios chip on the mboard with it.
E.g. see http://www.badflash.com if you are in the US or Canada.

If the bios chip is soldered into the mboard, that is another matter. Some places on the web can remove the old chip and install a new one that has already been flashed with the mboard maker's latest update, but you have to ship the mboard to them and back, and of course there is a labour charge, so it usually isn't worth doing that cost wise - it would probably cost you less to get a new or used mboard instead.
e.g. badflash can do that, but only if you are in the US.
.......

In the rare case Live Update might tell you you need to flash the boot block part of the bios......
On your mboard there is a
Bios Flash Jumper - a 2 pin header labelled JWP1 - right next to the bios chip socket or the bios chip and the end of the PCI slot.
- if the jumper is on the pins, the boot block part of the bios cannot be flashed.
- if the jumper is removed, the boot block part of the bios CAN be flashed.

Normally you DO NOT take that jumper off the pins.
Normally flashing an update does not flash the boot block - you have to select that before flashing if you want to do that.
........

Some mboard bioses have a setting that you must change to allow flashing before you flash the bios - the default setting protects the bios from being flashed.

Your manual is multilingual and does not have the complete bios settings descriptions in it. Therefore, I can't tell whether there is such a setting in your bios.

Some bioses will not flash properly if you are using any passwords in the bios Setup settings. Because of that, if you are using passwords there you should remove them before you attempt to flash the bios - if you don't the flash may fail.

In any case, it's too late now - that part of the bios is missing (erased, deleted) or corrupted, or the wrong version for the I/O chip on your mboard. You won't know whether you have the enable/disable flashing setting until your bios is restored.


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#4
April 4, 2008 at 14:59:29
One of the more common symptoms of a bad bios upgrade is the floppy drive is no longer seen. I'm not sure what a 'live bios update' is but it sounds like something that would be fraught with problems.

If it was me I'd get your original bios file or the correct update in the dos version, burn it to a bootable cd and then do the upgrade again.


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#5
April 4, 2008 at 15:21:34
DAVEINCAPS

Note that he presently has no floppy drive, and it appears the boot block bios is being loaded and it is looking for info on a floppy in a floppy drive

"I'm not sure what a 'live bios update' is..."
It's Live Update - a MSI utility you use in Windows to flash the bios and install other drivers, or rather, there are two versions of it.

"If it was me I'd get your original bios file or the correct update in the dos version, ..."

It appears MSI no longer has that obvious option on their web sites, but I haven't tried Live Update to see whether it provides that option as well as flashing in Windows.


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#6
April 4, 2008 at 17:54:33
Yeah, I know bios upgrades have become more 'convenient' for users without floppy drives (and wouldn't know how to make a bootdisk anyway). It's not the method I'd use unless it was a last resort. I see where any interruption in the live update process can render the bios unusable. It'd be pretty sad if the only way to do an upgrade was online with an already working system.

Missed the fact he had no floppy as I just skimmed over it and, what with no punctuation, I just read into it that his floppy had gone missing--a situation I've run into more than once.


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#7
April 4, 2008 at 18:07:24
Even if the OP had a floppy and a floppy disk with the proper files on it, I'm not sure that would help, though it would be worth a try. I ran into the same problem with an EVGA board when I mistakenly interrupted some software(Ntune) which, unbeknownst to me, was making changes to the BIOS. I did hook up a floppy and tried to restore the BIOS, but it didn't work. EVGA claimed the only solution was to get another motherboard, which I ended up doing.

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#8
April 4, 2008 at 18:17:42
Legitimate software other than that used to flash the bios does not do anything to the bios, even if you do mess up or interrupt it's installation.
If something corrupted the bios, it was likely malware, or some hardware related event, either of which could be unbeknownst to you, that damaged the bios.

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#9
April 4, 2008 at 18:25:59
The software was Ntune by Nvidia, which was supposed to be doing a stability test. It seemed to be taking longer than it should, so I stopped the process. When I rebooted, I received the same error message as the OP. Technical support for EVGA asked if I was using Ntune without my having to bring it up. They said that that software(which was legitimate and had nothing to do with flashing the BIOS, or at least made no claims about fashing the BIOS) was notorious for making changes in the BIOS.

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#10
April 5, 2008 at 11:40:47
Ok, so in that case it's probably chipset or cpu tweaking software.
I know of no software like that, that would flash the bios to make changes or that could possibly trash the bios so it could not be restored by using a bios Recovery procedure.
Even if that's the case the bios was trashed, if the bios chip is in a socket, you do not have to replace the mboard - for half the price of a mboard or less you can get a replacement bios chip already flashed with the latest manufacturer's update from places such as http://www.badflash.com .
You would have to wait a short while for the replacement chip to get to you but you would save yourself a lot of money.
(If you had an EPOX mboard they have replacement bios chips already flashed at the US site's Epox Store for merely $10 plus shipping and handling)
If it didn't flash the bios, whatever changes it made in the Cmos part of the bios, if any, are always reversable.
You should have been able to load bios defaults, at the very least by removing the battery for a few minutes with the case/PS unplugged, then boot Windows into Safe mode, then load a previous System Restore point, Or chosen Last Known good.... from the same menu Safe mode is on.

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#11
April 5, 2008 at 12:21:21
The BIOS chip was soldered to the motherboard. I did try to reset the CMOS, but it did no good. Fortunately, this was a third desktop I was using, so it wasn't esential that I get it up and running right away, so i got another motherboard. _perhaps you are correct-that something could have been done to recover the BIOS-but not according to EVGA.
Ntune by Nvidia is not chipset or cpu. tweaking software perse. Look here for what it claims to do: http://www.nvidia.com/object/ntune_...
I would recommend not using this software.

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#12
April 5, 2008 at 13:17:46
kx5m2g

I looked at your link.
It says it doesn't touch the bios settings - it does what it does entirely in Windows.

I think it's a lot more likely this was your case:
"If something corrupted the bios, it was likely malware, or some hardware related event, either of which could be unbeknownst to you, that damaged the bios."

It is a VERY good idea to NOT buy a mboard that has a soldered on bios chip.



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#13
April 5, 2008 at 17:39:03
Tubesandwires: "It is a VERY good idea to NOT buy a mboard that has a soldered on bios chip." I agree. I have motherboards from Asus and Abit, and they each have a replaceable BIOS chip.

"If something corrupted the bios, it was likely malware, or some hardware related event, either of which could be unbeknownst to you, that damaged the bios." I don't agree there. It could not have been a coincidence that precisely when I interrupted the Ntune software's optimization and rebooted, I recieved the error message "BOOT ROM CHECK SUM ERROR
DETECTING FLOPPY DRIVE A MEDIA" as the OP did.


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#14
April 8, 2008 at 00:33:31
i made a start up disk and copied files from drivers collection web site.

1. start up up disk
2. copied bios ver 1.0 for PM8M3-v
3. opened note pad and typed
awfl859g.exew7211vms.100/py/sn/cc/cp/cd/sb/r
i then saved this doc as autoexc.bat and got a message that said autoexec.bat file already exists do you want to replace it and i clicked yes.
4. powerd the comp and got this message

..starting...
A/<awfl859g.exew7211vms.100/py/sn/cc/cp/cd/sb/r

Bad file or Command

A/>_

so is it that i put the wrong command in the notepad or i got the wrong bios file.
my board is MS-7211 ver 1.0
PCb version 1.0
bios version 1.xxxxx


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#15
April 8, 2008 at 13:02:02
Assuming you have the correct files and the other syntax is correct, exew should be exe w, that is there needs to be a space between exe and w.

Also, make sure the flasher file, awfl859g.exe, and the update file, w7211vms.100, are on the disk.


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#16
April 8, 2008 at 13:21:15
"my board is MS-7211 ver 1.0
PCb version 1.0
bios version 1.xxxxx"

Okay, bios version 1.xxxxx
sounds right if Ver 1.0 is printed on the mboard beside the model number.


"starting...
A/<awfl859g.exew7211vms.100/py/sn/cc/cp/cd/sb/r

Bad file or Command"


Whatever you do, DO NOT use a command line switch with the flash utility that enables the boot block to be flashed!! It almost NEVER needs to be flashed!

You probably made a typo (typing mistake) and the command.com on the floppy (it has Win ME operating system files) didn't understand what you typed.

If it was the wrong bios update, you would get a message along the lines of wrong part or similar, or the flash utility would start but quit in a short time.

If the above flash utility and update file names were correct

awfl859g.exe w7211vms.100 /py


is all you need.
Note the two spaces - one after .exe and one after the name of the update file.
Both must be there.
Everything must be typed on one line.
Expand the Notepad window if you need to.
Pressing Enter at the end of the line is ok.
The file name you save it as must be autoexec.bat

/py loads a whole set of command line switches - that's usually all you need - it will automatically flash the bios, even if you can see nothing on your screen.

Remember to eject the floppy when the flash is finished before you reboot!

possible typo
awdfl859g? (note the d)


I know from previous experience I probably cannot run Live Update and have it find the bios update for YOUR computer model - it is meant to be run on the computer with the MSI computer mboard model that you want to flash - so I can't confirm whether you have typed the right names, or have the right update download.
With older MSI mboard models you have the option of using Live Update OR downloading the bios update manually - in fact the latter is the default.

......

OR

Since there was that message
"autoexec.bat file already exists do you want to replace it and i clicked yes"

the floppy already had autoexec.bat on it.

The MSI update files I have downloaded have the update, the flash utility, and autoexec.bat that already has the correct line in it - when you click on the downloaded file, it extracts all three to the location you specify.
It appears at the very least the dark blue Live Update has the Dos flash option, according to it's instructions on the MSI site, so those three files are probably in the downloaded update.

However, the line in that autoexec.bat may be only of use if you video - but it sounds like you do.

Click on the downloaded update again, extract its contents to the floppy, overwrite the existing files on the floppy.

Try booting with the floppy as is.

If you see normal flash utility screens, DO NOT select flashing the boot block.

Directions for using the normal flash utility screens is on the same page as where you got the updates on the MSI site - the How to Use for whatever Live Update version - the dark blue one is probably more useful..

If you have no video, or minimal video, that autoexec.bat line may not work.


In that case, look at the contents of the floppy on another computer.
RIGHT click on autoexec.bat if is there, choose Edit to see what's in it.

add (space)/py to the end of the line, Save .

boot with the floppy

Remember to eject the floppy when the flash is finished before you reboot!
......


DO NOT interrupt the flash process!
It should not take more than 5 minutes or so, and you should get a message (if you have video) that it was successful, or not, and you may hear a beep, or beeps, or no beeps at all when it has completed.
If you're not sure whether it has finished flashing, wait 5 minutes after the last time you see the floppy led come on, eject the floppy, and reboot.

If you forget to eject the floppy before rebooting, if the computer starts booting from the floppy, DO NOT interrupt the flash process! It will probably do no harm to flash it again, but removing the floppy at the wrong time may result in the bios being trashed again!

........

After you flash the bios, the first time you boot you will get a "Cmos Checksum Error...." or similar message. You will either be prompted to enter the bios Setup or you will automatically go there. Enter the bios Setup, and load Bios Defaults - set the date and time - Save settings, reboot. You MUST load Bios Defaults (or Clear the CMOS by moving a jumper on the mboard) in order for the bios update to be fully accepted by the mboard.

You should not see the "Cmos Checksum Error...." or similar message while booting after that.


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