Best RAM

Intel Core i5 750 qaud core processor
December 25, 2009 at 08:20:48
Specs: Windows 7 , 2.793 GHz / 2045 MB
I plan to build a computer around the Intel i5 processor and the Intel DP55SB Motherboard. I was going to use the OCZ PC3-10666 Platinum RAM, but have seen MANY negative reviews for this RAM -- far more negative than positive. However, most of the reviews are either by people using it with other than the i5/i7 processors (for which I believe this particular RAM was designed,) or people whose systems were attempting to operate the RAM at higher-than-recommended voltage. (1.6V or less.)

So my question is, should I be shopping for a more reliable RAM for this system (and what would you recommend,) or should this RAM work well for me as long as I set the voltage correctly?

I am the Human!


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#1
December 25, 2009 at 09:57:02
My guess is you should use the suggested ram based on the motherboard's web site or owners manual.

I think I read that the i5 doesn't really use ram like the i7 could so it might be a bit slower but still it is one of the fastest desktop choices.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#2
December 25, 2009 at 15:12:24
And don't buy a board made by Intel. Get one that's based on the Intel chipset, but made any of the other top manufacturers (Asus, Biostar, DFI, ECS, Gigabyte, MSI, etc).

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#3
December 25, 2009 at 16:11:25
I've been using Intel boards for years with no problems. I would need a little documentation to convince me why I should no longer use them.

I am the Human!


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#4
December 25, 2009 at 16:31:54
Jefro:

This is the only recommendation from RAM I can find at Intel:

• Four 240-pin DDR3 SDRAM Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM)
sockets arranged in two channels
• Support for DDR3 1600 MHz, DDR3 1333 MHz, and DDR3 1066 MHz
DIMMs
• Support for non-ECC memory
• Support for up to 16 GB of system memory

I didn't think a manufacturer would suggest an actual brand name -- might get them in some sort of trouble would it? Anyway, the OCZ RAM I was looking at falls within the recommended parameters. I was just concerned about all the negative reviews is all.

I am the Human!


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#5
December 25, 2009 at 18:31:09
Are you just a common user or are you an enthusiast? Intel boards may be stable (as are *most* boards based on Intel chipsets), but they are generally not designed with enthusiasts in mind. Their BIOS are *usually* more simplified than the BIOS offered by Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, etc.

If you're the type that doesn't tweak settings for best performance, doesn't overclock, never intends to overclock & is satisified with the performance that default settings provide, stick with Intel boards...you're just the type of person they were designed for. But if you're an enthusiast who likes to tinker with BIOS settings, overclock & wring as much performance as possible out of his/her hardware, you should be looking to other manufacturers for your motherboards.

And if that's not a good enough reason, another factor that may or may not be important to you is that Intel is abandoning most, if not all, legacy devices with it's newest boards. That means no PATA/IDE, no floppy, no standard PCI slots, no PS/2 ports, no serial or printer ports, etc.


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#6
December 25, 2009 at 20:01:03
And other major manufacturers DO recommend RAM they have tested. You evidently have been living under a rock.

They don't just recommend a brand but rather test specific RAM modules. These are listed by brand, speed, capacity etc. These are not the only modules that will operate in that particular board but are modules that were expressly tested and certified to work.

Look for a QVL or Qualified Vendors List posted on the website along with board specs.

jam knows what he is talking about.

If you choose the chip set then look at all the boards available and then decide. Based on features alone, you wilol probably pass on Intel boards.


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#7
December 25, 2009 at 22:47:33
Othehill, let's not get bent out of shape. I've been around this board for awhile and do not underestimate the knowledge of regulars. There was a jam active the last time I was around frequently, and this may even be the same guy. BTW, your name rings a bell as well.

All that aside, I suppose I'm just a common user. I've always managed to keep this rig going for about four years, but I don't really understand some things that may be basic to others. I'm only building a workstation and am not interested in gaming or overclocking. Although I do deal with a 3D modeling and rendering, I don't generally tweak my hardware. I am aware that certain software manufacturer's do test and recommend/support specific hardware, (Autodesk does with video cards, for one,) I was unable to find such support on the Intel site. I am most interested in sustainable performance and stability. I didn't think it unreasonable to assume that an Intel board would be most compatible for an Intel processor.

I've settled on the i5 processor so..... is that necessarily a P55 chipset? Because I have no idea. If there are mobo's by other manufacturers designed for the i5, are they P55's as well? What then should I be looking for as far as good reliable performance?

I am the Human!


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#8
December 26, 2009 at 06:04:34
Jude, sorry for over reacting. Guess I should have suggested you check the websites before assuming things.

I don't know what Intel does about RAM recommendations because I have a problem with the lack of legacy hardware support so I don't use Intel boards.


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#9
December 26, 2009 at 07:51:31
Sorry, I was unaware that Intel didn't offer a group of chips. Almost every other board I have seen does basically cover their behind. They only make a claim that their board would work with the chips they tested.

We use intel for server and have not had issues but we don't game.

Read up on the differences between how the i5 and i7 can best use ram. I think it is a bit faster on the i7.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#10
December 26, 2009 at 07:54:23
Late last night I went here to read some reviews of the "top five" mobo's for the i5/i7 processors. The problem I have with researching this stuff online is that reviews and recommendations are all geared towards gaming and overclocking. The "editor's choice" for these boards was based primarily on how easy it was to overclock. I really don't care whose product I use as long as it performs, is reliable and compatible with the other components. If Intel doesn't test their mobo with specific hardware and publish the results, I would more likely look for a manufacturer that did.

So now I'm checking out the home sites of the most popular boards I've seen and looking at their compatibility tests. Man, too much information!

edted: Hey, I was just looking through some of my old posts from '03 -- I have talked to both of you guys, Othehill and jam before -- I thought I remembered you guys. What ever happened to Kevin the Tech Dude?

I am the Human!


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#11
December 26, 2009 at 12:09:39
Well, I had pretty much settled on the ASUS P7P55D Pro mobo, but looking at the Qualified Vendors List (QLV) I see the only RAM listed is G.Skill and ADATA. I have heard of G.Skill, but not ADATA. It will not support two sets of Dual Channel memory which is confusing, seeing as how it has four memory slots. The best it recommends is two sticks of 3GB of the G.Skill RAM. It also says that if running 32-bit Windows it may only recognize less that 3GB. I plan to run a 64-bit system which should handle up to 16GB of RAM, but this mobo only recommends 6GB max.

I am the Human!


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#12
December 26, 2009 at 13:08:58
Update, if anyone is still interested...

So far, ASUS P7P565D-E Pro for my i5 with Patriot 4GB DDR3 1333MHz RAM. I could probably use some suggestions for power supply. I want as good a psu as I need without going overboard.

I am the Human!


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#13
December 26, 2009 at 13:42:59
You mean the P7P55D-E pro? Are you planning on 2-2GB sticks of RAM? What processor are you planning on?

I thought you wanted more than 4GB of RAM?

Need to know what graphics card/s is/are planned in order to properly size the PSU.


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#14
December 27, 2009 at 10:33:51
Here is what I have been able to cobble together for a wishlist so far:

ASUS P7P55D-E Pro mobo
i5 750 processor - Quad core 2.66 GHz 8MB L3 cache
2x2048MB Patriot Dual Channel Viper PC 10600 DDR3 1333MHz
ATI FirePro V3750 Video - 256MB GDDR3 (Later upgrade to ATI FireGL V7700 -- just don't have the bucks for those really high-end cards.)

I ran across a post somewhere in my reading that led me to think that maybe 64-bit systems can't use dual channel memory. The post itself made very little sense to me, but that is what I took from it. Is this so? If so, then I'll need to adjust my choice for RAM. Yes, I would like maybe 8GB of RAM, but I'm not prepared to put all of that into it at this time.

I am the Human!


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#15
December 27, 2009 at 11:34:05
OK, first thing is the RAM. There are a number of modules that fall into your category. I suggest you use RAM that runs a JDEC specs for voltage, which is 1.5V. The link below is one candidate. I didn't check to see if it is on the QVL or not.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

Are you planning on using one or two graphics cards now and/or in the future? This has the most impact on the PSU.

If you are as you put it just a common user then I would recommend just one card.

You query about 64 bit systems is an odd question. The processors that fit that MBoard are all 64 bit and the specs state dual channel supported.

Still can't recommend a PSU until you state whether or not you ever intend to run two graphic cards.

High end graphics cards can draw over 200W by them selves and require a more powerful PSU.
edit
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#16
December 27, 2009 at 16:48:08
The Patriot RAM that you linked to is not on the mobo QVL. I don't foresee ever using two vid cards, but I'm sure that I will eventually move up to a 1GB card, once I find one that is supported/recommended by Autodesk AND I can afford it. Also, I'm thinking about spending the extra $90 for the i7 860. Do you have any opinions as to whether or not that would be worth it?

I am the Human!


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#17
December 27, 2009 at 20:30:33
I will defer to jam on that question.

I wasn't suggesting that you buy that particular RAM. I posted another link in the same response that showed all the 1.5V RAM newegg.com has listed. Some of it has notations that it is approved for your application.

The point is this. The standard for DDR3 RAM is to run at 1.5V. Many vendors juice their RAM by running it at higher voltages. Higher voltages mean more heat and shorter life.

IMO RAM that is sold as PC1333 that runs at 1.5V is a better product than RAM that is sold as PC1333 at higher voltages like 1.7-2.0V.

I am suspicious of recommendations by Autodesk. Not sure they are on the up and up. Look at the specification requirements and buy a card based on that.

Going to the PSU, the most power hungry cards draw as much as 205Watts. That translates to 17A @ 12V. Your processor may be 125W. Then you have all the other hardware like drives and fans all drawing off the 12V rail.

If you were to change your mind and go with two high end graphics cards you are looking for a PSU with a single 12V rail @50A or so. Look at the link below for a PSU suggestion.

I am a bulilder by trade that uses residential CAD programs. I have used Autocad in the past and I can see the benifits of multiple screens. You may want to look into Matrox graphics cards.

One thing I am not up on is if you can connect multiple displays when using SLI or Crossfire. You could get at least 4 displays out of that possibly more.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#18
December 28, 2009 at 06:15:21
Othehill, yes I noticed the other link later, thanks. I agree that I should only consider RAM that runs at 1.5V. I am currently running two monitors of off one video card (nVidia GE Force 5600 FX IIRC,) with two outputs. I figured I would run my new rig the same way. I have not been up on the advancing computer technology for a few years, so I don't really know what SLI and Crossfire are, but I don't believe I would be running more than two monitors.

I found a couple of 750W PSU's with modular cables that I liked. I was hoping that 750W would be sufficient and give me a comfortable safety margin. Does that sound pretty reasonable?

I am the Human!


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#19
December 28, 2009 at 06:40:55
The motherboard you are considering has TWO PCIe x16 graphic slots. The concept behind that is to install two graphics cards that can work in conjunction by sharing the graphics duties. Thereby speeding up the process.

SLI is this concept when using nvidia GPUs. Crossfire is for ATI GPUs.

When selecting a PSU there are other things to consider besides that raw wattage number.

The link at the bottom of #17 is for a very good unit that has a pretty good price.

Post the models of the PSUs you are considering.


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#20
December 28, 2009 at 07:41:31
That does seem like a nice PSU and a good price. I was hoping to find one with modular cabling to help keep things neat inside. Here are links to the power supplies I was looking at:

Ultra X4 750W

Actually, I just noticed that the other PSU is SLI ready but not Crossfire. I think I will be using ATI graphics so that one is not for me.

I am the Human!


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#21
December 28, 2009 at 07:47:45
You didn't post the links. The one I linked is good to go for both SLI & Crossfire. Has more than enough power.

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#22
December 28, 2009 at 07:49:43
LOL, yeah, I seem to be having trouble with the links.

I am the Human!


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