ASUS P5GD1 Problem (Rebooting)

Asus P5gd1 motherboard
September 5, 2009 at 14:19:20
Specs: Windows XP
Well, I saw there was a post about this motherboard but nothing worth reading seeming as everyone was arguing over the same thing... I have a similar problem to that but I assume I can elaborate a lot better.

Situation:

Well, this is a clients computer I'm working on to fix and as I try to install windows on the machine the CD wouldn't boot, when I got it to boot due to the crappy configuration of its previous builder and poor wire management, I manage to start the WinXP setup... then after its finish loading the setup files I get a blue screen and a system hault.

So, I quickly determind that the machine has some hardware issues so, I took out the HDD and put it in a fully functional machine and formatted and installed XP without a problem. Putting the HDD back into the clients computer it POST's starts up shows me a blinking curser then takes me to the F9 page where you'd pick between Safe Modes and Start Windows Normally any and all selections loads and the machine reboots. I already tried switching out PSU's different HDD's and RAM.. everything pulled out of working machines just didn't want to function on this machine. So, I'm left with the CPU and motherboard along with some other PCI cards.

As of right now I'm stumped with an ever looping computer that just doesn't want to load in this machine.


See More: ASUS P5GD1 Problem (Rebooting)

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#1
September 5, 2009 at 22:50:37
"....then after its finish loading the setup files I get a blue screen and a system hault."

Did you get all the way through Setup?
If no, at what point did this happen?

Was there a message on the blue screen? If so did you copy it down, or do you recall exactly what it said?

"I took out the HDD and put it in a fully functional machine and formatted and installed XP without a problem. Putting the HDD back into the clients computer it POST's starts up shows me a blinking curser ..."

That's perfectly normal for XP (or 2000) if the two mboards have hardware that is more than a little different.You simply boot from the XP CD, and run the second Repair choice in Setup - what many call a "Repair install" and what I prefer to call a "Repair Setup" .
In the case of changed hardware, it will set Windows to the new hardware situation.

How to do an XP Repair Setup, step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

You will need to load all the drivers for the mboard after Setup is finished.

If your Windows CD does not have SP1 or SP2 or SP3 updates included, and you updated to SP2 or SP3, you may have to install SP2 or SP3 updates again to get them working properly. SP1 or later is required for USB 2.0 and hard drives larger than 137gb (manufacturer's size; 128gb in Windows and most bioses).
The regular original XP CDs and XP CDs that have SP1 updates have nothing about SP printed on the original CD; however the volume label (the label for the CD you see in Windows) for the original version XP CDs are different from those that include SP1 updates - you can search with that on the web to determine if it has SP1 updates included. Regular XP CDs with SP2 or SP3 updates included have SP2 or SP3 printed on the original CD.

NOTE: I have found some older XP Home CD's without SP1 or SP2 updates (e.g. made in 2001 - see the date on the CD) DO NOT have the second Repair option when you boot fronm the CD!
In that case, if you want to try the "Repair Setup" procedure, you have to either borrow an XP CD with at least SP1 updates included, or make your self a "slipstreamed" CD with SP3 updates integrated into Windows, and use that to boot the computer with.

........

So, I quickly determind that the machine has some hardware issues ..."

What led you to that conclusion?
What was your conlcusion?
Did you look up the error message on the blue screen?

"I already tried switching out PSU's different HDD's and RAM.. everything pulled out of working machines just didn't want to function on this machine."

Unless you supply further info that tells us otherwise, it sounds like you were just randomly trying things.
.......
Contrary to popular belief, it is extremely rare for ram that was working fine previously to go BAD, unless you have damaged it by something you did when installing or removing it, or unless it was damaged by some event such as a power failure or a power supply failing. Almost always, when you have a ram problem, it's either because the ram has a poor connection, or you have installed ram that is not compatible with your mboard's main chipset, or it's CPU's memory controller if that applies.

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

Ram that works in another mboard , or any ram you buy or have lying around, may not work properly, or sometimes, not at all - even if it physically fits and is the right overall type (e.g. SDram, DDR, DDR2, etc.; PCxxxx, xxx mhz) for your mboard. In the worst cases of incompatibilty your mboard WILL NOT BOOT all the way with it installed, and the mboard may not even beep - the ram has to be compatible with the mboard's main chipset, or in the case of recent mboards, compatible with the memory controller built into the cpu.

The same applies for testing your ram in another mboard - the ram must be compatible with the other mboard - if it isn't, any results of testing the ram on the other mboard cannot be relied upon to be valid.

If you still have the ram that was installed when the system worked fine, try installing just that ram.


See response 5 in this for some info about ram compatibilty, and some places where you can find out what will work in your mboard for sure:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
Correction to that:
Mushkin www.mushkin.com

Once you know which module ID strings work in your mboard, you can get them from anywhere you like that has ram with those ID strings.

If you have brand name ram, it is usually easy to look up whether it's ID string is in a list of compatible modules found by using your mboard or brand name system model number.
If the ram is generic, that may be difficult or impossible.

If you do a ram test, do that AFTER having tried cleaning the contacts and making sure the ram is seated properly - otherwise any errors found may be FALSE.
If the ram is incompatible with the chipset, or on more recent computers, incompatible with the memory controller built into the cpu, it will likely FAIL a ram test - that is NOT a true indication of the ram being faulty - there is probably nothing wrong with it, and it will pass the test if installed in a mboard it is compatible with.

If you want to try a memory diagnostic utility that takes a lot less time to run a full pass than memtest86 does, this one is pretty good - Microsoft's
Windows Memory Diagnostic:
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag...
It can be toggled (press T) to do a standard or a more comprehensive set of tests - use the default 6 test one first - if it passes one pass of that, use the latter one. A few of the tests in the latter set are intentionally slower.
If you don't have a floppy drive, see the Quick Start Information at that Microsoft link for how to make a bootable CD of the Windows Memory Diagnostic (you need Windiag.iso - you don't necessarily need to use the program they mention to add it to the CD).
...........

A hard drive that's rebooting Windows doesn't necessarily indicate there's anything wrong with the hardware.
- Win XP is set by default to automatically reboot when it encounters an unrecoverable software error.
- When you install a hard drive that already has Windows 2000 or XP on it that was set up on another computer, if the difference in hardware is more than a little different, 2000 or XP often cannot deal with the change and will not boot all the way into Windows - typically you see the first bit of Windows graphics, then a black screen with a blinking cursor top left and nothing further happens.

Sometimes we've heard of things going farther than that - and Windows won't load in any mode.
Running a"Repair Setup" should fix that situation.


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#2
September 6, 2009 at 11:25:38
On the computer I'm working on no, it wont let me get all the way through the setup... This is the process I took with the hard drive I was going to originally format. I put in the WinXP Pro SP2 (legit) CD into the tray, boot it then I go to the "Windows Setup" screen as it loads all the setup files, then thereafter I receieve this msg (Blue screen);

"A problem has been detected and windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer.

If this is the first time you've seen this stop error screen, restart your computer. If this screen appears again, follow these setps:

Check for viruses on your computer. Remove any newly installed hard drives or hard drive controllers. Check your hard drive to make sure it is properly configured and terminated. Run CHKDSK /F to check for hard drive corruption, and then restart your computer.

Technical information:

*** STOP: 0x0000007B (0xF8981524, 0xC0000034, 0x00000000, 0x00000000)"

This happened before I did anything to the machine as I was trying to do a simple format of the drive. Then, I plugged in the hard drive in another machine to do the CHKDSK since it the other machine wouldn't let me do anything. So, since the hard drive was working fine on my dummy PC I have here I installed Windows XP Pro w/SP2 perfectly fine. Then thats where the continues loop occured. I have installed many hard drives from other machines to my clients machines with a pre-installed XP using different drives for their hardware and I've never encountered this problem, it is rather strange.

So, pretty much this computer doesn't let me get to the options to do a Repair Install;

"To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER.

To repair a Windows XP installation using Recovery Console, press R.

To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3."

It gave me the same error to any hard disk I would install on this machine. Yes, I did randomly try things to see if I could figure out what was the hardware causing this problem. I knew it wasn't the RAM because I would get beeps during the post or poor performance... plus the RAM is working fine as I put it back to its respective machines to test them again after I took them out of the machine with the problems, perfectly working memories. Also ran MemTest to check for errors.


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#3
September 6, 2009 at 23:26:50
Why were you re-installing the operating system?

Did your client have any specific symptoms other than Windows wasn't working as it should?
.......

Stop: 0x0000007B...........INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE

can be caused by a hardware problem but it can also be caused by a software problem, usually related to the bios.

One thing it's extremely unlikely to be caused by is a wonky power supply.
It's also unlikely to be caused by a hard drive "logic board" or physical problem.

I searched the Asus forums in general about this error, and about this error for this mboard.
Nothing stuck out as especially likely to cause Stop: 0x0000007B for this mboard.

Apparently, it can be caused by ram errors, sometimes caused by ram that is compatible but the default ram voltage in the bios is not correct for the particular modules being used, but you say you've tested the ram and it's fine

Apparently, a problem with the graphics card can cause this error.
This mboard does not have onboard video.
You have not mentioned the graphics card.
Did you try removing the graphics card, cleaning it's contacts, re-installing the graphics card, or try another graphics card?

I looked at the Asus forums regarding this mboard.

There was at least one mention of bad capacitors on the mboard (I didn't look at all the posts about this mboard).
....

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

This was the original bad capacitor problem - has some example pictures.
History of why the exploding capacitors and which mboard makers were affected:
http://members.datafast.net.au/~dft...

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components - power supplies, Athlon cpu's, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...
......

If you don't see anything obvious or suspicious regarding that.....

I looked at this model's manual.
http://support.asus.com/download/do...

If you are using a SATA hard drive

- Apparently, you can get this Stop: 0x0000007B error if you have a drive you intend on booting from connected to the wrong SATA socket.
- on this mboard, you can only boot from a partition on a hard drive (or boot a bootable disk in a SATA optical drive) if the drive is connected to SATA1 and SATA2 - the two SATA sockets closer to the COM header on the mboard (they're seen by the bios as master).
SATA3 and SATA4 are only for drives storing data (they're seen by the bios as slave).

Apparently, you can get this Stop: 0x0000007B error if you have a data cable connection problem.

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.

- the bios defaults have the SATA controller(s) in Standard IDE mode (IDE compatible mode).

(bios Setup - Main menu - IDE Configuration - Configure SATA as: Standard IDE)

If you have the SATA controller(s) in another mode, apparently, in some cases, you get the Stop: 0x0000007B error some time affter you press F6 to provide a floppy disk in a floppy drive with the SATA controller drivers on it.
In that case this MAY work - if you set the bios to Main menu - IDE Configuration - Configure SATA as: Standard IDE, you don't need to press F6, and Setup will work normally (you can load the SATA controller drivers later after Setup has finished, then change the SATA mode to something else in the bios, if you wish).

NOTE that (2000's and XP's) Setup will only find SATA drivers that are on floppy disk in a regular floppy drive in almost all cases - a USB connected floppy drive is not recognized as a valid drive unless it is one of a very small number of models, most of which have not been made for many years. Setup cannot find SATA drivers on a CD, a hard drive, or a USB connected drive of any type other than a USB floppy drive it recognizes.
......

Apparently, a USB connected optical drive can cause this error.

In theory, having a USB connected printer or multifunction device connected while Setup is running could cause this error.
.......

You haven't mentioned cards in slots. Are there any installed other than a video card? If so, try removing it/them while running Setup.

I've had odd resource conflicts with one particular USB mouse model. If you're using a USB mouse you could try another model or a PS/2 mouse.

You could try unplugging everything that's not necessary for running Setup, if you haven't already done so.
.......

if you're using an IDE hard drive.....

Don't mix CS and master/slave settings for two drives on the same data cable.

Some hard drives, e.g. some Western Digital models, have two different ways master can be set - one, e.g.Master (single) for when it is by itself on a data cable, the other e.g. Master with slave, for when there is another drive on the same cable. Make sure that's correct.

For 80 wire data cables, one specific end connector MUST connect to the mboard - usually it's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a three connector data cable.

On older mboards, it may not detect a drive correctly or at all if it's jumpered slave and is by itself on a data cable, or if it's jumpered CS and connected to the middle connector on a three connector data cable by itself. On newer mboards, often the drive is detected even if that's the case, BUT in some circumstances it won't be detected correctly.

(this also applies to IDE optical drivesand floppy drives)

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

- the bios defaults have the RAID IDE (second) header controller(s) in Standard IDE mode (or similar). You may have problems if the hard drive is connected to that if it's not in that mode.

If you have the hard drive connected to the other (first, main chipset) IDE header, it could be it will be less likely you would get the error.


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#4
September 6, 2009 at 23:49:40
hi
pl clean the system as there might be dust causing reboot.
next you may check bios for acpi mode and set it to vertion 1
try clean install
it should solve your problem

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#5
September 7, 2009 at 09:19:41
I've seen in many mentions of the STOP: 0x0000007B error problem that a specific file was named along with the message. Do you see that? You may need to click on a "Details" link or similar to see the name of the file.
........

Regarding the hard drive you installed XP on from scratch on another mboard and transferrered to this one....

The continuous loop you describe - not being able to get Windows to load no matter what you try and the computer rebooting - usually is not caused by a hardware problem.
Running a "Repair Setup" should fix that.

"So, pretty much this computer doesn't let me get to the options to do a Repair Install;

"To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER.

To repair a Windows XP installation using Recovery Console, press R.

To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3."

See this:
How to do an XP "Repair Setup", step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

and the other info in response 1 regarding that.

You choose the first choice on that page.
The second Repair choice in Setup - Repair your existing Windows installation or similar - is on a later screen.

I'm assumimg it's Home or Pro.
If it's XP MCE, you will need the OEM 2 CD MCE set, not just one CD (or the equivalent on a DVD).

You MUST be able to supply a Product Key that Setup will accept the first time, otherwise you can't complete the "Repair Setup", and the second Repair choice will NOT appear the next time you boot from the Windows CD and thereafter.
If the system is a brand name system, the OEM Product Key found on the official Microsoft label on the outside of the case will be accepted ONLY if the CD you installed Windows on the hard drive with is/was a OEM XP CD. It won't work with a retail full version CD installation.
........

"I knew it wasn't the RAM because I would get beeps during the post or poor performance... "

It only takes a small number of ram errors for Setup to not work normally. I've seen several cases in my own experience where nothing obvious seemed to be wrong with the ram or it's connection, the mboard beeped normally etc., yet Setup had problems because of a relatively small number of ram errors. When I tested the ram in those cases, I found ram errors - sometimes merely cleaning it's contacts and/or re-seating it cured the problem; sometimes I found one or more ram modules were incompatible - often, only when more than one was installed - they tested fine when by themself.
Due to those experiences, I have since cleaned the ram's contacts and then tested the ram BEFORE I have needed to install Windows from scratch or run a "Repair Setup".
E.g. in some cases, there was no problem with Setup until after the partition had been software partitioned and formatted.

".....plus the RAM is working fine as I put it back to its respective machines to test them again after I took them out of the machine with the problems, perfectly working memories. Also ran MemTest to check for errors. "

It is not clear from that whether you tested the ram in the problem computer.
As I said in response 1, a memory diagnostic test can only be relied on to be valid if you test the ram when it's installed in the computer you're having problems with. If this computer has no floppy drive, surely you can connect one and run the bootable floppy version of a diagnostic, or if you don't want to do that, you could use a bootable CD version, preferably burned to a CD-R which should read fine in any computer.
.........

If someone has flashed the bios without loading bios defaults afterwards, that could cause the Stop: 0x0000007B error.
In most cases when the bios is flashed, the bios defaults are not loaded as a part of that process. If the version the bios was flashed with is different from the version the bios had before it was flashed, at least some of the bios features are likely to not work properly if the bios defaults for the changed bios version have not been loaded.

If in doubt, load bios defaults, or, better, optimized bios defaults.
Then make sure the ram voltage is the same as specified for the particular ram modules - if it's not, change it "manually" in the bios settings.

If you have two or more modules that require different ram voltages, that is likely to cause ram error problems - the bios will probably set the ram voltage to the lowest value.
.......

Apparently, having settings set in the bios that overclock the mboard / cpu can cause the Stop: 0x0000007B error when you try booting from the Windows CD. In that case, loading bios defaults before booting with the Windows CD cures the problem. You can overclock the mboard / cpu again after Setup has finished.
........

Apparently, some who had an existing installation of Windows they were trying to fix were only able to get rid of the Stop: 0x0000007B error by installing Windows from scratch.

Apparently, some who were installing Windows from scratch and wanted to load SATA controller drivers were only able to get rid of the Stop: 0x0000007B error by using nLite to make a "slipstreamed" CD, preferably burned to a CD-R which should read fine in any computer, which had the SATA controller drivers integrated into Windows via nLite's features.

......

I searched the Asus forums for: 0x0000007B p5gd1
http://www.google.com/custom?hl=en&...

and just: 0x0000007B

but some subjects have no solution or were never answered

and especially for the latter search, there were so many I looked at subjects only the first few pages.
.....

By the way, there areat least three p5gd1 mboard versions.
One is labelled on the web site as the plain, probably orginal, p5gd1 - the others have something after p5gd1.
Are you sure it's the p5gd1 and not one of the other versions?
.......

USB devices may not work or be detected correctly when they're connected to certain USB ports, e.g. ports in a hub or on the front of a desktop case.

See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...


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