4th Master HDD SMART Error Press F1 to resume

January 26, 2016 at 06:12:10
Specs: Windows 10
As I power on the computer, it goes through my motherboard start up, but stays at the motherboard start up for around 3 minutes. It then states "4th Master hard drive error S.M.A.R.T Press F1 to resume." I only have one hard drive and i had restarted my computer after a driver update, and then this happened. Did my driver update somehow completely mess up my hard drive?

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#1
January 26, 2016 at 06:19:55
No, your driver update caused a reboot that let you get a warning about your failing hard drive, which is better than having it fail on you without warning.

Also, back up anything you need, and get a replacement drive as soon as you can.

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#2
January 26, 2016 at 06:47:28
Is there a way to keep my hard drive? Like delete everything off of it and make it uncorrupted?

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#3
January 26, 2016 at 07:37:06
Doubt it... Once a drive starts to show error messages and the like... time to safeguard its contents; and then replace the drive.

Copy "any - all" important personal stuff to DVD (at least) - and if possible to another external (usb) drive. Double check the copies are OK- accessible on at least one other computer (if possible). Label and store the disks in a safe place. Also make an image of the drive as is; as likely you can then transfer/restore that image to a new/replacement drive? Transferring an image means you retain a more or less working system; apart from a possible/probable need to re-activate the OS (as the hard drive will not the one the OS was associated with when activated).

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Related Solutions

#4
January 26, 2016 at 10:29:06
Would it be possible to defragment it and make it work again? My friends had said that could work.

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#5
January 26, 2016 at 10:55:17
File system defragmentation is a tool for optimization, not a tool for repair. In fact, the extra strain on the disk during the defrag could cause the drive to fail faster.

I don't know exactly which S.M.A.R.T. error you got, but best case scenario for you would be if the logic board is failing. If so, you could try to get a disk of the same make/model, and swap logic boards, but that's only easy if your drive is in the 3.5" form factor. If this is a laptop, and I'm assuming it is, you have a 2.5" drive. That means you may or may not require soldering equipment to remove the logic board.

So, how's that backup coming along?

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#6
January 26, 2016 at 10:56:34
Again I seriously doubt it... And even then I would still opt for an immediate safeguarding of "all" my personal files; and make an image of the drive. Then secure/obtain a decent and reliable replacement drive. Don't risk data loss; safeguard your files at least - now...

Once a drive starts to cough up error messages assorted.. time to consider - seriously - replacing it.

The longer you leave it the greater the likelihood of it crashing at a very critical moment; and possibly taking all your files with it. Don't go down that road - safeguard data etc - and if possible make an image of the drive; then replace it.

If you replace it whilst it's still "working" then you can clone the drive to the new one and then install the new drive etc. Again you will likely have to re-activate your OS due to the change of hard drive; but that's not usually an issue.

Drive manufacturers either provide a free cloning utility with the new drive, or have it available on their website for download. Typically it's a cut down version of Acronis.


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#7
January 26, 2016 at 11:20:18
Ive had my desktop for a month now as i got it for christmas. I am not the biggest computer geek either. I am going to call tonight and see if I can get it replaced for free.

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#8
January 26, 2016 at 13:28:06
I put in my Drivers & Utilities disk (chip set) that came with the computer. It had gotten through the reboot screen and onto the windows logo loading screen. It said at the bottom that it was repairing windows and i restarted my computer after around 10 minutes. Now it works just like it did last night. I dont know if this is a fix for anyone else but this fixed my computer.

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#9
January 26, 2016 at 13:53:42
SMART errors come before the OS loads so it's hard to believe it was a windows problem. Possibly the bios wasn't configured right.

But whatever makes it work. Thanks for posting back with the fix.


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#10
January 26, 2016 at 14:43:51
Good to know that you managed to resolve it all (hopefully permanently).

Again I encourage you to develop the practice of copying (duplicating) any important "stuff" (which you wouldn't like to lose) to DVD at least; and if the pennies allow to an external usb hard drive too. Do this regularly...

Also make the recovery disk set that most computers manufacturers advise when you reserve the system; even though there may be a recovery partition on the system as well. Sadly very few do either...; and wish they had at some future time...


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#11
January 26, 2016 at 16:31:46
If you got a SMART error, you should really run a hard drive diagnostic to check the condition of the drive. I don't recommend storing any data on it until you're 100% sure it's OK. Start by using CrystalDiskInfo: http://crystalmark.info/software/Cr...

Other programs can be found here: http://www.techsupportalert.com/bes...


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#12
January 27, 2016 at 09:13:29
If the system is "new" - bought at Christmas - I'd be more than a little inclined to lean on the vendor for a replacement system. No "new" system - HD not the least - ought to cough up possible errors that soon? Warranties are there to be explored and used...

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