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2 Routers one switch

August 4, 2010 at 17:45:55
Specs: Windows XP

I currently have two routers connected to a switch that then is connected to a modem. Will I have problems with this configuration?

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#1
August 4, 2010 at 22:14:30

Why do you think you need to do that ?

The two routers can't have the same URL (192.168.xxx.xxx) to access their configuration - if they do, you have to change the URL of one of them.

Have you tried connecting a computer to a port in each router ?

If you're using a high speed cable modem, I would think you should be able to connect to the internet on all available ports on the routers other than WAN , in theory ??. You should be able to connect to the internet through available ports in the network switch, but they won't have hardware firewall protection. A cable modem connection usually requires you register the wired adapter MAC address of the modem, or a serial number of the modem, with the ISP, so anything that connects to the modem directly or indirectly should be able to connect to the internet. However, you may have problems if you use the NAT features of the two router's configuration.

If you're using a DSL or ADSL connection, some of the ISPs require you register the wired adapter MAC address of your router or the wired network adapter on your computer with them. That's done by the installation software the ISP provides, or sometimes you can go to one specific URL to do that, even when you can't access the internet otherwise..
In that case...
- you can clone one computer's network adapter address when it's the only one connected, or type in one, in the router's configuration, but sometimes only one MAC address is allowed, and no two networked devices can use the same MAC address. Even if two MAC addresses are allowed, both routers can't connect to the modem and the ISP at the same time
- you wouldn't be able to connect computers to the available network switch ports to connect to the internet

.......

What will work for sure - all or nearly all the available ports will work to connect to the internet and have the protection of one router's hardware firewall settings ...

- connect the modem to one router's WAN port, connect the network switch to the same router's port other than WAN

- connect the modem to one router's WAN port, connect the network switch to the same router's port other than WAN, connect the other router to either a port on the network switch or to a port other than the WAN port on the first router.

The two routers can't have the same URL (192.168.xxx.xxx) to access their configuration - if they do, you have to change the URL. of one of them.
The second router has to have it's DHCP disabled - that essentially makes it a switch - it then no longer uses hardware firewall features. You may not be able to use the WAN port on that second router to connect a computer to.

You may need to change the default range of addresses the second router can assign to devices connected to it.

Recent or fairly recent network switches and routers will usually auto detect whether the network cable is straight through wired or cross wired and the connection will work with either type of cable, but in any case, if the led for the port lights up, it's connecting.


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#2
August 4, 2010 at 22:35:13

First let me explain that I put this configuration in at my business not at home. The reason I did this was to create some sort of separation between my business computers and my customers that want to access Wi-fi. So far I have been able to connect to the internet with both routers no problem and by the way I use a DSL modem. I do have different ip's for my routers, in house i use 10.10.10.x, public 192.168.x.x.

Is this setup totally wrong or does it does it serve its purpose?


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#3
August 4, 2010 at 22:59:01

"I use a DSL modem"

If you can connect to the internet if you plug a network cable from a computer's network adapter into an available port on the network switch, that connection won't have the protection of a "hardware" firewall (all routers have a "hardware" firewall) .

If you don't need to use the NAT feature in the router's configurations, the way you have things hooked up should work fine, in theory.

You can have up to 255 network connections to the modem. Each router has a range of URLs that can be assigned by the router to devices connected to it. You may be able increase that range in the router's settings, if you get complaints about not being able to connect to the 192.168.xxx.xxx one.


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#4
August 5, 2010 at 12:58:15

It should work. Routers do not exactly protect systems or lans. Consider a linux box with untangle running or some other software advanced firewall between your companies data and also your free area. Your company's data is more at risk than you think. If you have the funds then you might get more advanced such as a dedicated device but the linux/bsd free ones are pretty good.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


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