Solved what is vsync?

November 16, 2005 at 16:29:42
Specs: XP, P4 1GB ddr400

i just wonder what vsync is. what does it do? i see lots of games disable it by default. and in order to get 100 fps in CS instead of 60 fps with nvidia video card, i have to disable the vsync.

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✔ Best Answer
November 18, 2005 at 19:53:34

>>"If playing a game, leave it enabled to >>prevent what appears to be tearing of >>imaged on your screen."

General rule of thumb in gaming is to DISABLE Vsyc with-in the properties menu of your video card ( right click the desktop ) and in your game options as well. The next step to reduce tearing would be your monitors refresh rate; start at 100 and work down from that number. Most if not all games I play run succesfuly with 1024*768 @ 90Htz VSYNC DISABLED with out much tearing if any.

Custom Built has mentioned 85 and 100 htz. there is also 75, [72 and 60]---> these last 2 might cause an epiliptic seizure.

Vsync is vertical syncronization, as CustomBuilt has mentioned Vsync locks the frames at the vertical (up and down) refresh rate of you monitor when enabled, but also reduces performance. Experiment with this option if you are looking for a performance gain.

lammas cry¿?rp$



#1
November 16, 2005 at 16:33:57

also, should i disable it or just leave it on? if i leave it on, would the video looks better?

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#2
November 16, 2005 at 17:29:24

Vsync matches your monitors refresh rate/frequency, with a 3D applications frame rate.

In other words, It doesn't let your frame rate go above your monitirs refresh rate.

85 Hz. = 85 FPS
100 Hz. = 100 FPS
and so on.

Have the lambs stopped crying Clarice?


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#3
November 16, 2005 at 20:00:41

If benchmarking your system, it should be disabled.

If playing a game, leave it enabled to prevent what appears to be tearing of imaged on your screen.

Please help survivors of Hurricane Katrina!

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Related Solutions

#4
November 18, 2005 at 19:53:34
✔ Best Answer

>>"If playing a game, leave it enabled to >>prevent what appears to be tearing of >>imaged on your screen."

General rule of thumb in gaming is to DISABLE Vsyc with-in the properties menu of your video card ( right click the desktop ) and in your game options as well. The next step to reduce tearing would be your monitors refresh rate; start at 100 and work down from that number. Most if not all games I play run succesfuly with 1024*768 @ 90Htz VSYNC DISABLED with out much tearing if any.

Custom Built has mentioned 85 and 100 htz. there is also 75, [72 and 60]---> these last 2 might cause an epiliptic seizure.

Vsync is vertical syncronization, as CustomBuilt has mentioned Vsync locks the frames at the vertical (up and down) refresh rate of you monitor when enabled, but also reduces performance. Experiment with this option if you are looking for a performance gain.

lammas cry¿?rp$


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#5
November 18, 2005 at 20:03:42

There is no visible performance gain. If the frame rate of the game exceeds the refresh rate of your monitor, it means your monitor can't keep up, and therefore you don't get to actually see the performance gain.

This is an important thing to disable if and only if you are benchmarking your system. You don't want your average fps to be lowered simply because your refresh rate of your monitor isn't as high as your system is capable of.

This is the so called "performance gain", which incidentally comes when your system is capable of rendering at fps rates higher than your refresh rate, which is at least 60, but more like 85. If you're already rendering at 60 with vsync enabled, why do you need more, especially if it results in image tearing?

Please help survivors of Hurricane Katrina!

www.redcross.org


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#6
November 19, 2005 at 09:51:39

Hero I dont know if you play games much, but the physics change to a bit with higher frame ratres IE. you can jump a bit further, crouch a touch faster, switch weapons, run smooth through heave fire fights etc.

We would Disable this to render the most frames possible to gain an advantage and make full use of the game engine, thats all.

rp$D



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#7
November 19, 2005 at 22:47:46

"Hero I dont know if you play games much"

I play a decent amount.

"the physics change to a bit with higher frame ratres IE."

The physics engine is independent from the graphics engine.

"you can jump a bit further, crouch a touch faster, switch weapons, run smooth through heave fire fights etc."

No, you perceive these things happening faster because they're displayed faster. Even then, this only comes into play when frame rates exceed the refresh rate, so it's not significant since the human brain can only process visual data but so quickly.

Please help survivors of Hurricane Katrina!

www.redcross.org


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#8
November 20, 2005 at 10:20:27

One game for instance where the physics really do change is q3. This engine is used by many games. Also after you read over this site; see here you will see what I am saying. This chart would also apply to CS:Source and HL1 and 2 becuase of Binary Space Partioning (BSP).

The first game to employ this method was the original Doom ; the quintessential FPS game. The FPS shooter exploded and all have taken advantage of BSP-tree since.

To learn more about what role physics play in your games, and Binary Space Partitioning please follow this link here.

Regards,

Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'rp$D


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#9
November 20, 2005 at 11:51:02

First off, that is an interesting article, and if it is correct, I stand corrected that your graphics engine does effect how far your jump.

However, please notice that your jumping distance is apparently erratic.

At fps of 145, you have this value that adds to your jumping distance: 46.83. @ 161, it's 3.35.

It would seem to me that you would probably want more consistency in your jumps, not expecting to jump far only to happen to get a few more or a few less frames that causes your jumping to be reduced. If that's the case, VSync capping your frames would ensure your fps would be a consistant number if your system can render at or higher than that speed.

I'd also like to point out that most people aren't very particular about being able to jump a little bit farther, but they do notice image tearing.

Please help survivors of Hurricane Katrina!

www.redcross.org


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#10
November 20, 2005 at 14:54:38

Herp,

Try 'reading' over the links again. You obviously misunderstand something.

"At fps of 145, you have this value that adds to your jumping distance: 46.83. @ 161, it's 3.35."

The 3.35 and 46.83 that you are noting are not distances; theses are the maximum positive accumulated error in 0.675 seconds.

Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'rp$D


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#11
November 20, 2005 at 18:14:38

Correct. Those are the added accumulated errors, which improve your jumping distance.

Please help survivors of Hurricane Katrina!

www.redcross.org


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