see a comparison between the EVGA SR-X and the ASUS Z9P3-D8

January 27, 2012 at 08:30:27
Specs: Windows 7
I would like to see a comparison between the EVGA SR-X and the ASUS Z9P3-D8. The SR-X has integrated bluetooth and tuboboost supporting 96 G RAM while Z9P3-D8 has remote management and supports 128 G RAM. Both are quad supported. The SR-X PCIe 3.0s are the first 4 slots while the Z9P3-D8 is every other. Both have a limit of 4 PCIe 3.0 slots but I believe the Z9P3-D8 can use the other 3 as PCIe 8.0. I think every other is a improvement because many GPUs use up two slots of space. Both should be overclockable (although EVGAs seems to have really great software for overclocking and no word from Asus yet) and the Z9P3-D8 is a much smaller board. They will both be available near same time and around $500.


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#1
January 27, 2012 at 09:47:53
Overclocking is best done manually, not by Software.

Therefore you need to read the Manual of the board to see what options are available in the BIOS


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#2
January 27, 2012 at 14:42:33
Are you seriously considering either of those boards for an enthusiast board?


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#3
January 27, 2012 at 21:29:53
I will be building one soon as available (around march 6).

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#4
January 28, 2012 at 00:40:29
Out of curiosity, what do you plan on spending on the rig and what are you building it for, a gaming rig?


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#5
January 28, 2012 at 06:52:03
$500 for a board is ridiculous & a complete waste of money. And which CPU(s) do you plan on running? It's seems pointless to buy a dual socketed board to run a single CPU, but to run dual, your only choice is the Xeon because you can't pair up the standard Sandybridges. Speaking of which, there are only a few CPUs currently available for the LGA2011 socket. The Intel Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition is over $1000. Here's a list of Xeons:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/sa...


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#6
January 28, 2012 at 18:10:28
Around $5,000. 3.1 eight cores for now. Cheap single GPU for now cause waiting for PCIe 3.0 x 16s to come out. For sale (if doesn't sell, for myself). just over 2 years ago I built one similar to this (KFN4-D16 with dual socket 2.0 dual cores, 128G DDR RAM). A year later I upgraded it to two 2.5 quad cores when they became available. I will be upgrading this board to the Ivy Bridge 10 cores when they become available in about a year. I have waited till then to make a better one. I had many offers on my last one but didn't sell. I won't make that mistake with this one. I just hope this one boots faster with SSDs and DDR3s. Server boards seem to have that in common. I have been building customs boards for myself and for others since 2002. As for gaming, I would like to start soon as time permits.

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#7
January 31, 2012 at 19:38:40
Since the software is built into motherboard It won't void the warranty as manual overclocking often does.

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