Questions about OverClocking

May 8, 2011 at 15:08:05
Specs: Windows Vista, Pentium 2.0 Ghz/4GB Ram
I've got a (^^refer to sys specs) computer and am wondering about overclocking.

Can anybody reccomend any good (And free!) utilites for overclocking?
Will it cause any long-term damage to CPU and/or HDD?
Are they efficent at large heavy gaming? (The Sims 3, Halo x.x, etc.)
Does it affect the Graphic Card?

I would upgrade to Intel i7 but don't want to spend $$$$.$ for a good gaming computer for Halo.
My name may be OLDISGOOD, but i have a newer computer and need every inch i can get!!
P.S are there any overclocking programs (again, free!) for older systems? (DOS, Windows 3.1, 95, 98)


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#1
May 8, 2011 at 19:00:16
" (^^refer to sys specs) "

What specs? You mean "Pentium 2.0 Ghz/4GB Ram"? That doesn't even scratch the surface. Here's what we'd need to know:

CPU - make/model, clock speed, FSB speed
RAM - amount, type, speed
motherboard - make/model
video card - make/model, type (PCI, AGP, PCIe, or integrated)
hard drive - make/model, capacity, type (IDE or SATA)
power supply - make/model, wattage, amperage rating for +3.3v, +5v, +12v

Of course, if you have an OEM system (Dell, Gateway, HP/Compaq, etc), you can just post the model number so that we can look up the specs. Or just post a link to the spec page.

BTW, overclocking should be done thru the BIOS, not thru software. If you have an OEM system, the BIOS is deliberately crippled to prevent too much user tampering. In other words, if you have an OEM system, you can pretty much forget about overclocking.


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#2
May 8, 2011 at 19:12:27
Software overclocking is not really the answer. It rarely gives you satisfactory results and does not address any of the possible problems and risks involved in overclocking. The only real way is to do it the manual way through your BIOS, but if you have a factory system, you probably could not anyway. Factory systems are typically made with less expensive components and do not tolerate the additional stress, so the manufacturers lock down the adjustments in the BIOS that would be needed to properly overclock.
That said, if you want specific help with this, you will have to give very specific details on your system (make, model) or specifics on all components if custom/customized.
That said, you would probably should invest in a good gaming video card if you have not already since this is where MOST of the gaming performance improvement will come from. A hot CPU will still not game well if it does not have an equally hot graphics card, and a moderately good CPU with a really good graphics card will stand up very well against anything but a custom gaming rig.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
May 10, 2011 at 11:32:38
Ya, it's an OEM system DELL laptop that I bought from Staples. Here are full specs if it would help:

(no idea as to the MotherBoard type, just an OEM peice of cr*p)

DELL Inspiron 1545 laptop with 4 GB of DDR2 ram, (If FSB speed is shown as "memory speed" in my BIOS) memory speed is 800 Mhz

Intel Pentium T4200 @ 2.00 Ghz clock and 1 MB of L2 cache (SUCKS!)

(heres the killer:) Intel GM45 Integrated Graphics w/32 mb Dedicated mem and random shared mem (steals regular RAM for graphics) and Video BIOS version is 1706 (????)

320 GB HDD, 30 GB set aside for system backup (Got no idea if it's IDE or SATA. guess SATA as it's a laptop)

Power Supply is a 90 W AC adapter running a 48 Whr battery


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Related Solutions

#4
May 10, 2011 at 16:37:57
Forget overclocking it. OEM desktops are typically locked down in their BIOS to prevent you from overstressing the included components beyond their baseline capabilities and having all kinds of failures that will be blamed on the manufacturing. Laptops ALWAYS have their BIOS tightly locked down for those reasons, PLUS the battery life, PLUS the systems ability to cool itself inside that portable case. As I said, not happening.
If you want to get into overclocking because you want to, or you want to try to get the hottest machine possible within a restricted budget, or you want to run programs or games with high requirements, you are going to have to build a desktop for that (note that I said build, OEM's still won't cut it). Do a lot of research on overclocking, especially the platform you decide to go with, and as important, research what your requirements are and decide what you are going to expect/accept out of the rig. Once you decide on a platform (CPU brand and socket) then research the best for your purposes and search out those write ups on the hardware you are considering from an overclocker's point of view to see how they think it stacks up against similar models.
Of course by the time you have done this and accumulated the funds, something new will be out to consider....(normal).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
May 11, 2011 at 16:40:03
Uhhhhhhh........ I'll just stick to getting a "supercomputer" OEM laptop. Aming for a i7 920 3.2 Ghz processer. figgured that I can get the one i'm aming for about 1,200$. Still a lot of cash but i'll crack the piggy bank.
P.S> if anyone is a HP fanatic looking at this page, FORGET IT. HP suks. Dell is better and they have AWEsome tech support. (If the warranty is still effective. If the DELL warranty is expired it's a pain to get support. then i go to this website for all you VERY knowledgeable people.)

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#6
May 11, 2011 at 20:03:41
Just make sure that the graphics are up to the programs or games you plan to run since it is something you cannot upgrade AFTER you purchase it like you could if you had a desktop. If there is an option of better graphics and you might need it, spend a little more to get it, you will be happier in the long run.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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