OC my e6600 2.4 ghz nto 3ghz

Intel Core 2 duo e6600 2.4ghz processor
November 18, 2010 at 05:22:04
Specs: Windows 7
hi i have a e6600 2.4 ghz1066 with 4 gig ddr3 ram1066mhz
im currently OC my cpu to 2.7 ghz
(9X300fsb) isit nesesary to have my cpu/ram ratio @1:1 currently it is sitting @ 18:6
how would i go abot getting it to1:1 iv just resently oc my cpu to 2.7 but when i get home today i am going to bump it up to 3 ghz so ar it is stable @2.7 the temps dont go over 40C

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#1
November 18, 2010 at 05:51:22
The ideal ratios for a Core 2 Duo system are either 1:1 or 1:2. With both your CPU & RAM running at their default speeds, the ratio would be 1:2. That's because the ratio is based on frequency, not the bogus QDR & DDR ratings. A 1066MHz FSB CPU runs a 266MHz frequency, DDR2-1066 runs at 533MHz frequency. 266:533 = 1:2.

To get your CPU up to 3.0GHz, you need to increase the CPU frequency to 333MHz. However, if the ratio is left at 1:2, that means the RAM frequency would increase to 667MHz (DDR1333). It's unlikely your DDR2-1066 RAM will be able to run at this speed, therefore the system will become unbootable. What you'd have to do is change the BIOS setting so that the ratio becomes 1:1, then your RAM speed would drop to 333MHz (DDR667) to match the CPU.

If your motherboard is capable of 1600MHz, you'd get better performance if you clock the CPU at 7.5 x 400MHz & run the RAM as DDR800.


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#2
November 18, 2010 at 06:03:12
mickliq thanks alot il try that when i get home but i have DDR3 ram not DDR2 ram as you have stated would i still be able to get a 1:2 ratio if i keep my cpu fsb @333

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#3
November 18, 2010 at 06:10:37
"i have DDR3 ram not DDR2 ram as you have stated"

Sorry, I missed that. The same settings still apply.


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#4
November 18, 2010 at 06:36:11
ok thanks ok im a bit of a noob at OC iv just resently started. when i set my fsb to 7.5X400 how would i go about getting my ram to DDR800 or would it automaticaly default itself to DDR800 therfor setting it to a ratio of 1:2

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#5
November 18, 2010 at 06:46:06
What's the make/model of your motherboard?

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#6
November 18, 2010 at 19:45:30
7.5 Multiplier x 400MHz freq.= 3000MHz or 3.0GHz CPU which is 4 x 400MHz freq. = 1600MHz FSB and 2 x 400MHz freq. = 800MHz DDR2 (that's what the '2' stands for in the DDR2 (it multiplies (simulates) the memory speed x 2 by splitting the memory path into 2). Your Ratio will be 1:1 at this setting. If your rig runs this setting stable, you will have a very good set up for 24/7.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
If all else fails, read instructions.


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#7
November 18, 2010 at 21:36:55
my mother board is a gigabyte Gigabyte GA-G41MT-D3 LGA775

last night i changed my fsb to 9x333 theirfor upping my ram to 1333mhz just to try it out and it works and boots up its stable jus i noticed from original 2.4ghz my ram ran @ 15% on idle now on 3 ghz my ram is running @ 35%? . all my temps stay 30C and below on idle

i realy dont wnt to keep my fsb to 9X333 because my ram life is shortend or is this not a major thing to worry about ?

so what is better for my pc 7.5X400MHz or 9X333 both run stable


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#8
November 19, 2010 at 04:30:02
In order to set your CPU to 9x333MHz frequency = 2997Mhz or 2.997GHz or basically 3GHz Your RAM will be running at 333MHz x your memory multiplier (set in your BIOS). If your memory multiplier is set to 2.0 then your RAM will be running at 333 x 2 = basically 667MHz which is a Ratio of 1:1 and is perfect. If your memory multiplier is set to 2.4 then you are running 333x2.4= basically 800MHz which is a Ratio of 3:4 and while many will tell you it is not 'perfect', it is a perfectly acceptable setting and a perfectly reasonable ratio.
Do not confuse your CPU's settings with the RAM settings. While your boards buss frequency will affect your CPU frequency AND your RAM frequency, they are NOT exactly the same. Please read over all of the answers and try to understand the math involved and the terms used.
If your RAM is rated at 800MHz DDR2 then it will run just fine at 800 MHz (400x2 multiplier) and 667MHz (333.3x2) and at 533MHz (256x2) without danger. Your BIOS will tell you what your multiplier is (memory multiplier) and what your RAM is running at. It may list what your memory is rated at '800' on the left column and what it is running at like '667' or '800' just to the right of it. You just want to avoid a number on the right like '865' which is beyond what it is rated at and should be avoided (that's the territory of extreme overclockers and most RAM does not take to it very well --- and the settings get difficult and often unstable).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
If all else fails, read instructions.


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#9
November 19, 2010 at 05:25:52
AGAIN MY RAM IS 1066 DDR3 not 800DDR2 so please re answer my questions

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#10
November 19, 2010 at 06:46:47
"AGAIN MY RAM IS 1066 DDR3 not 800DDR2"

Dude, you need to pay attention & understand what you're being told. The ratio info provided by Fingers is very important. There are 2 ratios that are considered optimal for a Core 2 Duo (or Core 2 Quad) system - 1:1 or 1:2. The ratio is based on the frequency, not the bogus "effective" speed ratings. Since you only have DDR3-1066 RAM (266MHz frequency), 1:2 will only be attainable under certain circumstances, so you should use 1:1 instead.

If you configure your CPU to run at 1333MHz FSB (333MHz frequency), your RAM should be configured to run as DDR3-667 (333MHz frequency) for 1:1 ratio. You *may* be able to run the RAM as DDR3-1333 (667MHz) for 1:2, but the minor performance gain over 1:1 probably isn't worth the risk.

If you configure your CPU to run at 1600MHz FSB (400MHz frequency), your RAM should be configured to run as DDR3-800 (400MHz frequency).

The faster the FSB, the better the performance, so your ideal overclock settings would be CPU at 7.5 x 400MHz with the RAM underclocked to DDR3-800.

Also, once you've settled on your CPU/RAM settings, you should stress test your system before using it for anything critical. Here's a list of CPU software:

http://www.benchmarkhq.ru/english.h...



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#11
November 21, 2010 at 22:20:47
ok i get it now iv read all the posts from the top i fully understand now
it has been a great help . mick thanks for the cpu software link

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#12
November 23, 2010 at 05:19:38
i cann't get my multiplyer to 7.5X its ether 7 or 8 in my bios it does not pic up the piont so when i type in 7.5 it comes out as75 ??? is their a way around this issue please help

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#13
November 23, 2010 at 18:02:16
My Gigabyte 'P43' board uses only whole numbers also for the multiplier (I believe most do) but there is a second line in the BIOS for entering the '0.5' for those CPU that support it only. I do not remember whether my 'G41M' board has this setting since the older CPU in it I believe does not support it. Yours should have this too, but if your CPU does not support it, it may be grayed out.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
If all else fails, read instructions.


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#14
November 24, 2010 at 22:24:52
my mobo doesn't suport it i can only insert whole numbers so what do you rate is my next best option?. currenly im running @ 9X333 =3ghz and my ram @1333mhz its stable and is @ a ratio 1:2

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#15
November 25, 2010 at 06:06:06
It also doesn't support 1333DDR3 at that speed, look at your board's specifications:
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/pr...
You will need to read off your BIOS screen what it is actually running at (or use CPU-Z to get the reading in windows). Your memory multiplier will set the memory speed relative to your base bus speed. If your multiplier is 2.0 then your memory is running at 333x2.0=667DDR3 if it is 2.66 then 333x2.66=886DDR3 etc. The line just below that on your BIOS (If it is similar enough to my 'older' series G41 Gigabyte board) will show you two columns, the left is your RAM's potential speed and the right is your RAM's actual speed.
You should be able to use 8x400=3.2GHz for your CPU and your RAM you should begin with a multiplier of 2.0x400=800DDR3 (underclocking your RAM) if it is available for a Ratio of 1:1 (you can experiment with other options after you determine stability). After you determine stability you can try 9x400=3.6GHz.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
If all else fails, read instructions.


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#16
November 25, 2010 at 09:58:01
"i cann't get my multiplyer to 7.5X its ether 7 or 8 in my bios it does not pic up the piont so when i type in 7.5 it comes out as75 ??? is their a way around this issue please help"

Set the "CPU Clock Ratio" to 7 & the "Fine CPU Clock Ratio" to 0.5, however, the Fine CPU Clock Ratio is only an option if your CPU supports 1/2 multiplier settings. It's all explained in the motherboard manual.

"currenly im running @ 9X333 =3ghz and my ram @1333mhz its stable and is @ a ratio 1:2"

Nothing wrong with that. I'm surprised your 1066MHz RAM is able to run stably at 1333MHz (667MHz frequency). Are you sure you don't have PC3-10666 & you're just getting confused by the naming convention?

PC3-10666 = DDR3-1333 = 1333MHz (effective) = 667MHz frequency

PC3-8500 = DDR3-1066 = 1066MHz (effective) = 533MHz frequency


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#17
November 25, 2010 at 21:52:04
no "Fine CPU Clock Ratio" @ all in my bios even thou my cpu does or doesn't ? suppurt "Fine CPU Clock Ratio" it should still be in my bios but just greyd out???

PC3-10666 = DDR3-1333 = 1333MHz (effective) = 667MHz frequency

PC3-8500 = DDR3-1066 = 1066MHz (effective) = 533MHz frequency

im not sur far as i recall it is pc3-10666 i will check tonight


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