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Solved how to cpu overlock

January 23, 2013 at 22:49:42
Specs: Windows server 2003, 2.661 GHz / 1535 MB

can i overlock my cpu with this current spec? and if possible please someone tell me how do i do that?

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✔ Best Answer
January 26, 2013 at 21:30:12

You first need to list your CPU number in order for us to tell that.
You also should tell us exactly what RAM you have so we can recommend the correct combinations
Max Voltage depends on the CPU model so we can look up the specs.
Monitor your temperature with HWMonitor or SpeedFan because heat is your enemy and the more voltage you use, the more heat you generate. Use only enough voltage to achieve stability with your overclock and no more. OverVolting is the easiest way to destroy your CPU, so be careful. My Core 2 E7500 and E8200 both list a max voltage of 1.3625V. If your CPU has a similar max voltage, you are way too high. I am stable at a significantly higher overclock on both CPU's at a much lower voltage. This means that my system is running at a much lower temperature and therefore I can run them 24/7 if I need to without problems. Go back to the stock voltage, monitor temperature, and test stability. If you have stability, you do not need more voltage, but you can possibly try a higher overclock until you run out of stability. Then you can try raising the voltage by two or three hundredths of a volt for stability. Verify your settings with CPU-Z.
What is your RAM speed set to? What is your FSB? Your base frequency? Your CPU multiplier? What is your CPU/Ram Ratio? Are you trying to achieve a 1:1 Ratio?

Reply with all of the requested information above and include also all of your current BIOS OC settings, your temperature readings (in degrees C), and how and if you have determined stability.
If you just post your partial results without the important requested information and the details on your OC, then we cannot help you.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
January 23, 2013 at 23:28:19

There are tutorials all over the web - you just use Google Search - dead easy to find more overclocking info than you could possibly read in a lifetime. Good example here:
http://www.pcpro.co.uk/tutorials/36...

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#2
January 24, 2013 at 04:37:33

List ALL components completely and include ALL makes and model numbers.
Read, Read, Read. Then explain what you understand and what you have tried as well as what you expect to get out of your machine and then we can have some reasonable suggestions.
Overclocking is not a simple plug in a few numbers and you are done, it is a process that you need to understand and follow. It is something that you need to be involved in with understanding so you can achieve a fast, stable, usable machine. Without understanding, you can just create a head ache and possibly fry components. We can make some suggestions and starting points, but you need to meet us half way. First learn, then come up with some possibilities, then tentatively try a few conservative tests. Make sure that you always monitor your internal temperatures and your overclock numbers as well as test your stability.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
January 24, 2013 at 05:35:46

I'm guessing this is your board: http://www.biostar.com.tw/app/en/mb...

We need to know exactly which CPU & RAM you have. Can't recommend any overclock settings without them. "2.661 GHz / 1535 MB" isn't enough info. Is it a Pentium, Core 2 Duo, Xeon? What FSB speed? Is the RAM DDR2-667, DDR2-800, DDR2-1066? 1GB + 512MB or 2 x 1GB with 512MB used for onboard graphics?


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#4
January 26, 2013 at 20:30:01

i just overlocked it to 3.00MHZ with core voltage 1.36V
is it safe?

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#5
January 26, 2013 at 21:30:12
✔ Best Answer

You first need to list your CPU number in order for us to tell that.
You also should tell us exactly what RAM you have so we can recommend the correct combinations
Max Voltage depends on the CPU model so we can look up the specs.
Monitor your temperature with HWMonitor or SpeedFan because heat is your enemy and the more voltage you use, the more heat you generate. Use only enough voltage to achieve stability with your overclock and no more. OverVolting is the easiest way to destroy your CPU, so be careful. My Core 2 E7500 and E8200 both list a max voltage of 1.3625V. If your CPU has a similar max voltage, you are way too high. I am stable at a significantly higher overclock on both CPU's at a much lower voltage. This means that my system is running at a much lower temperature and therefore I can run them 24/7 if I need to without problems. Go back to the stock voltage, monitor temperature, and test stability. If you have stability, you do not need more voltage, but you can possibly try a higher overclock until you run out of stability. Then you can try raising the voltage by two or three hundredths of a volt for stability. Verify your settings with CPU-Z.
What is your RAM speed set to? What is your FSB? Your base frequency? Your CPU multiplier? What is your CPU/Ram Ratio? Are you trying to achieve a 1:1 Ratio?

Reply with all of the requested information above and include also all of your current BIOS OC settings, your temperature readings (in degrees C), and how and if you have determined stability.
If you just post your partial results without the important requested information and the details on your OC, then we cannot help you.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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