how Overclocking my cpu based on my setting

September 22, 2011 at 08:51:27
Specs: Windows 7 32bit, 2.4ghz / 2gb ram

CPU Arch : 1 CPU - 2 Cores - 2 Threads
CPU PSN : Intel Core2 Duo CPU E4600 @ 2.40GHz
CPU EXT : MMX, SSE (1, 2, 3, 3S), EM64T
CPUID : 6.F.D / Extended : 6.F
CPU Cache : L1 : 2 x 32 / 2 x 32 KB - L2 : 2048 KB
Core : Conroe (65 nm) / Stepping : M0

Freq : 2400.03 MHz (200 * 12)
MB Brand : XFX
MB Model : MG-610I-7059
NB : NVIDIA GeForce 7050 rev A2
SB : NVIDIA nForce 610i rev A2

GPU Type : NVIDIA GeForce GT 430
GPU Clocks : Core 700 MHz / RAM 800 MHz
DirectX Version : 11.0

RAM : 2048 MB DDR2 Single Channel
RAM Speed : 400 MHz (1:2) @ 6-5-5-17
Slot 1 : 2048MB (6400)
Slot 1 Manufacturer : Noname


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#1
September 22, 2011 at 09:20:53

Refer this link for full detailed instruction with images... Or else the thing given below may work for your configuration also...
http://lifehacker.com/5842094/speed...

Method One: BIOS Overclocking

If you're lucky, your machine will have some overclocking options in the BIOS; this is the easiest and most reliable way to overclock your machine. Not everyone has this option, but you'll want to check before you move on to option two. To find out if you can overclock through the BIOS, reboot your computer and hold the setup key as it boots—usually this is the Delete key, though it could also be something like F2 (your boot screen will say "Press DEL to enter setup" or something similar).

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingOnce you're in the BIOS, look around for the advanced CPU options. For me, they were under the "JumperFree Configuration" menu in the "Advanced" tab. It should look something more or less like the screen to the right—note that all BIOSes are a little different, so your screen won't look exactly the same, but you should have some similar options available.

If you don't have any of these options, you'll unfortunately need to skip to Method two below, which uses software to overclock your system. If you do have those options in the BIOS, though, read on.

Step One: Tweak Your Initial Settings

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingSome of you may have a "load optimized CPU OC setting", or something similar—these are actually overclocking options built into the board. All you need to do is choose a percentage value or choose a CPU speed from this menu, and your motherboard will do the rest. If you only want to overclock a little bit, this is fine, but I found I was able to get my system past these values by doing it manually. And, to do it manually, we need to tweak a few settings first.

Poke around the CPU menus and see if your processor supports hyperthreading. Turn that feature off if you have it, as it can really increase your temperatures. Disabling it will allow you to get a higher overclock, though if multitasking and number of cores is more important to you than the clock speed, you can leave it on—you just won't be able to overclock as high. Also, scroll down to your Vcore setting and take it off Auto. This is the voltage that affects your CPU speed. Set it on whatever the default value is, and leave it there for now.

Step Two: Raise Your Front Side Bus Speed

To overclock, we need to raise your front side bus (FSB) speed. The front side bus determines how fast your CPU runs. If you have an option for System Clock Mode or something similar, set it to Unlinked instead of Auto. This should give you the option to change your FSB and memory clocks separately. Leave your memory clock where it is—we're not going to deal with overclocking RAM today—and note the default speed of your FSB. Compare that to the stock speed of your processor, and you should find that particular chip's multiplier. For example—my chip runs at 1.60 GHz stock, with a front side bus value of 533 MHz. That means my chip's multiplier is 1.6 / 533 = 3.—every time I raise my front side bus' speed, I'll raise my CPU's clock speed by three times as much.

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by Overclocking, Remember your goal CPU speed? Divide that by the multiplier you just found. That's the front side bus value you want to eventually get to. Write it down so you don't forget, and let's get overclocking. Then, head up to your FSB value and raise it 10 or 20 MHz. For me, that meant raising it up to 550 MHz, which brought my total CPU speed up to 1.65 GHz (remember, because of my 3x multipler).

Step Three: Stress Test Your Machine

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingExit the BIOS, saving your changes, and reboot into Windows. Open up CPU-Z and make sure your CPU frequency is higher—it should be, since you just raised the FSB. Then, open up RealTemp and Prime95. Select "Just Stress Testing" if prompted. If the Torture Test window doesn't automatically come up, go to Options > Torture Test and set it to Blend. Hit OK and let it run. Keep an eye on your temperatures, because the more you overclock, the higher they can get. The hottest temperatures you want to reach while running Prime95 are up to you, but you definitely want to stay a good 20 degrees below the TJMax value, or the value at which your processor will automatically shut off. If you get too close to this value, you can seriously decrease the life of or damage your processor (check out this guide for more information on CPU temperatures). For the Atom, this means keeping your temperatures below 70 degrees Celsius—I like to be conservative and keep them below 60 or 65 degrees if possible.

Step Four: Repeat as Necessary

If Prime95 runs okay for 5 or 10 minutes, reboot back into the BIOS and raise the FSB another 10 MHz. If Prime95 throws you an error, or if your computer gives you the Blue Screen of Death, reboot into the BIOS and raise the vcore one notch instead.

Repeat this process until you reach your goal CPU speed or until your temperatures get too high. If the former, run Prime95 for a good six hours or so to really stress test your machine. If the latter, however, you need to re-evaluate your goal or, if possible, get a better cooling system in your machine.

Once you've got Prime95 running stable for six hours or so at safe temperatures, you've achieved a stable overclock.

Method Two: Software Overclocking

If you don't have any BIOS overclocking options, you'll have to go the software route. In that case, you'll need to use a program called SetFSB, which can overclock many computers, including most Atom machines out there. However, once again, it doesn't work with every machine—so you'll need to figure out if it's compatible with yours.

To see if your machine is supported, search SetFSB's home page (by hitting Ctrl+F on your keyboard). for your computer or motherboard model. You're looking for the clock generator compatible with your machine. If your machine isn't listed on that page, do some Googling and see if someone's tried to overclock that model before. Every model has a clock generator; the goal is to see if SetFSB supports yours.

If your clock generator isn't one of the ones listed on SetFSB's home page, then you're sadly out of luck and can't overclock your machine. However, if you do see your clock generator on their list, download the software and we can get to overclocking. Note that some clock generators require the newer, shareware version of the program, which costs about 10 dollars—though most are supported in the freeware version.

Note that my particular netbook is not supported by SetFSB, so I haven't actually been able to test it myself—but the process is the same as overclocking through the BIOS, and it's a very popular program that's been widely tested by the community, so as long as your machine is supported it should work well.

Step One: Tweak Your Initial Settings

So, once you've confirmed that SetFSB supports your clock generator, open up SetFSB and pick your clock generator from the dropdown list. Then hit "Get FSB". You should see that the "Current FSB/DDR/PCI-E/PCI Frequency box populates with the speed values that determine your CPU speed, your RAM speed, and your graphics chip speed.

Step Two: Raise Your Front Side Bus Speed

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingTo overclock, we need to raise your front side bus (FSB) speed. The front side bus determines how fast your CPU runs. The software method, unfortunately, raises your RAM and graphics chip speeds at the same time as your CPU, meaning you have more things to stress test, and more things that can affect the stability of your overclock. It isn't the worst thing in the world, but it does make things a little more complicated—as soon as one of those things becomes unstable, you need to back down a notch and that'll be the highest overclock you can achieve on any of them.

In SetFSB, drag the topmost slider to the right. You'll see the FSB values go up in the "Select FSB/DDR/PCI-E/PCI Frequency" box. This is what you'll be changing those values to. Raise it so the FSB value is 5 MHz or so above stock and hit the Set FSB button. Open up CPU-Z and confirm that your FSB is actually higher, and you've got yourself a very mild overclock.

Step Three: Stress Test Your Machine

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingNow we need to stress test all three components you're overclocking. We'll start with Prime95: Open it up and select "Just Stress Testing" if prompted. If the Torture Test window doesn't automatically come up, go to Options > Torture Test and set it to Blend. Hit OK and let it run. While it's running, open up Real Temp and keep an eye on your temperatures. The more you overclock, the higher they'll get. The hottest temperatures you want to reach while running Prime95 are up to you, but you definitely want to stay a good 20 degrees below the TJMax value, or the value at which your processor will automatically shut off. If you get too close to this value, you can seriously decrease the life of or damage your processor (check out this guide for more information on CPU temperatures). For the Atom, this means keeping your temperatures below 70 degrees Celsius—I like to be conservative and keep them below 60 or 65 degrees if possible, maybe even less on a netbook.

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingOnce you've run Prime for a few minutes, let's switch to Memtest. Download Memtest for Windows and start it up. Hit OK at the first dialog, and make sure it's ready to test "All Unused RAM". Then, click Start Testing. Let it run to 100% coverage at least once. If it shows any errors, you need to back off your overclock. If you're running a dual-core version of the Atom, run two instances of Memtest at the same time, an divide the amount of RAM used evenly between them. You may want to hit Ctrl+Shift+Esc to open up the Task Manager and go to the Performance tab to see how much RAM is free and available to test. If you have 600MB of RAM available, for example, give each instance of Memtest 300MB of RAM to test.

Speed Up Your Low-Powered PC or Netbook by OverclockingLastly, we're going to test our graphics chip. Open up ATITool. You'll probably get a message that most of its functions have been turned off; and that's fine. Hit the "Scan for Artifacts" button and let it go. If it runs for 5 or 10 minutes without it beeping and restarting the clock, then your overclock is still stable. If it beeps, shows any yellow lines, or restarts the clock to 0, your overclock is unstable and you need to back off.

Step Four: Repeat as Necessary

Once you've run all three tests, go back and move that slider another notch to the right, or until your FSB is another 5 MHz higher (if the slider can't go any higher, check the "Ultra" box and you'll have more headroom). Then repeat all three tests. Do this until one of the tests fail, or until your temperatures get too high, and you've reached the maximum overclock you can for that machine.

Note that you'll have to re-overclock your machine every time you reboot, so remember what your final settings are. Whenever you reboot your machine, start up SetFSB, pick your clock generator, and move that slider to where it was before—you won't need to run those stress tests again. This can seem annoying, but it's also nice, since you don't really always want to overclock your system—if you don't have an outlet nearby, you may be better off sacrificing that speed for a machine that lasts longer.

This should get you started, but as you can see, there's a lot more to overclocking that low-powered computer than just raising the FSB! We've only scratched the surface of what you can accomplish today, so if we've piqued your interest, be sure to look up more guides for your specific machine, to find out what settings and speeds you should be aiming for—especially if you went the BIOS route and didn't overclock your graphics chip. And, be sure to help each other out in the comments, too!


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#2
September 22, 2011 at 09:37:14

Try (333 x 9) and underclock memory to 667 DDR2.
Disable intel speedstep
Lock pci express to one hundred megahertz. Save settings and exit.

The video card u have is not good for gaming.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#3
September 22, 2011 at 10:20:50

Unfortunately, XFX makes it difficult to get any info. Here's an old newegg link to your board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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Related Solutions

#4
September 23, 2011 at 05:31:22

Google and read up more on overclocking until you understand more about what many of the settings are and how they effect the overclock.
The settings kuwese gives you are a good start and should work for you.
The first answer I feel has some misconceptions and a few easily misunderstandable statements, but I got board reading after a while so have not finished all of it.
Overclocking should only be used for desktops.
Overclocking should only be done manually through the BIOS, not through software and not through any automatic settings. Those are rarely satisfactory and not good over about 10% OC.
I have never heard that Hyperthreading effects the overclock, and if it does, this would only be during extreme overclocking and I assume you are looking for a machine to be used in the real world. Leave it on.
Speedstep CAN effect the overclock so you should disable it first.(as in #2 above)
Your PCIe needs to be manually fixed to 100MHz so you do not accidentally OC it beyond what your hardware can handle. (as in #2 above)
Your memory needs to be in step with your CPU set frequency and the preferred ratio is 1:1 (as in #2 above) so read up further on this as well.
Your original 'Frequency' was 200MHz with a multiplier of 12 giving you a 2.4GHz final speed. The suggestions of a Frequency of 333 with a multiplier of 9 will give you a final speed of 3.0GHz (333x9=2.997MHz or 3.0GHZ). This raises your FSB from 800MHz (200x4=800) to 1333MHz FSB (333x4=1333) which is nearly as important as the CPU speed. Your memory should be run in step with the CPU so using the same base speed of 333MHz with DDR2 will give you a final memory speed of 667MHz and keep your CPU/RAM ratio at 1:1. Each motherboard treats this differently, some show actual speed, some make you set the base speed and a multiplier, some allow you to set the ratio.
Read, Read, Read. Google the word Overclock with your board model number and your CPU number and you may find some discussions on exactly your hardware. Do not get too worked up by extreme results you may read about, they are not really suitable for normal usage, but some things can be learned from reading them such as a deeper understanding of what many of the settings and how they effect other things.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
September 25, 2011 at 03:06:05

i played wicther 2 and dirt 3 at max setting its good

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#6
September 25, 2011 at 06:45:37

i did it but its still 2.40 ghz

i made multiplier to x9 and

fsb mem clock mode auto and link and unlinked so i pick unlinked and i get

fsb QDR mhz min = 400
max = 2500
and mem mhz min = 400
max = 1400

and the 2 of them mad at 799 so what do i Type in them to get my cpu to 3.0 ghz


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#7
September 25, 2011 at 07:38:55

i played wicther 2 and dirt 3 at max setting its good
You are not telling us the truth.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#8
September 25, 2011 at 11:21:21

lol did you use it befor i had xfx 9500 gt and i sell it and i got this xfx gt 430 evga so i just upgerded my card any way lets foces on the cpu

i made multiplier to x9 and

fsb mem clock mode auto and link and unlinked so i pick unlinked and i get

fsb QDR mhz min = 400
max = 2500
and mem mhz min = 400
max = 1400

and the 2 of them mad at 799 so what do i Type in them to get my cpu to 3.0 ghz


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