Dual core shuts down cores on overheating

March 6, 2013 at 09:57:27
Specs: Windows 8
I have an Intel P6100 2.00 Ghz , 3MB L3 cache. I have noticed that when there is excessive computing (like playing a game and stuff, or something which uses a lot of computing power) the cores tend to shut down alternately .
ie core #0 works at full capacity and core #1 is shut, and after a while core #0 is shut and Core #1 is working at full capacity, ( thus i just get half the computing power i should :/

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#1
March 6, 2013 at 14:00:22
"Dual core shuts down cores on overheating"

That's what they're supposed to do. 1st they throttle back to try to lower the temp, if that doesn't work, they shutdown. More than likely your heatsink was installed incorrectly or it's loaded with dust. Please post your CPU temp.


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#2
March 6, 2013 at 20:16:37
Use HWMonitor or SpeedFan and report the results in degrees C. Post first start idle, 10 minutes later idle, normal usage (less game), and gaming after 10 minutes.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
March 8, 2013 at 00:34:13
the temperature when my computer was idle was about 60c, while browsing like with about 15 tabs open on chrome the temp was about 70-75, with heavy gaming the temp was above 80c with max of 89c

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#4
March 8, 2013 at 04:45:57
Your CPU has a maximum rating of 90C so it is designed to shut down at that temperature to prevent damage. If you continue to run it at those temperatures, you will reduce it life span. Your CPU is a mobile Pentium so you have a laptop or possibly an all-in-one desktop. You need to clean out the vents with a can of compressed air to blow out all of the accumulated dust. If needed, open all of the access panels and blow through those also. Understand that laptops are made to be used on hard surfaces, not laps and beds which block many of the vents on the bottom and the sides of the unit. There are laptop cooling pads with built in fans and many of them can be used on soft surfaces to help keep your system cooler.
If blowing out the dust through the vents and panels, plus a cooling pad does not solve this for you, you may want to seek professional help, unless you are comfortable disassembling the unit to do a more thorough cleaning.
As long as you have used the unit for quite a while with out trouble and no one has disassembled it, it is probably not an improperly installed heat sink. If it was serviced recently, then that is a distinct possibility.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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