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CPU temp of 90 degree

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October 29, 2006 at 06:29:25
Specs: XP SP1, P4 2,4/524

Hi, this message is re postings about sudden increase of CPU temp. Since yesterday, my com's CPU temp goes up to 90 degrees and even more. I have a P4 at 2,4 GHz, brand new I would say.The CPU temp goes up until the system automatically shuts down. The odd thing is that this happens randomly, it took four hours to die at one time, and two seconds at another, repeatedly shuts down after pressing the start button, and all of a sudden, power on with one hour until again, it went down. I thought it was a virus, I don't know now. In BIOS, it says that thye CVPU fan speed is 3150 rpms, and the system fan speed is zero (?!!). I used CPUICE, and got that my CPUs temp is 80 degrees, and the CPUs fan has 3000 rpms. Anyways, I would appreciate suggestions. Thanks

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#1
October 29, 2006 at 07:23:00

"I have a P4 at 2,4 GHz, brand new I would say"

That's an odd statement. Either it's brand new or it's not. And what is new...the entire system or just the CPU? If it's the CPU, who installed it? It could be that the HSF (heatsink/fan) wasn't correctly installed on the CPU.


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#2
October 29, 2006 at 09:24:44

"It could be that the HSF (heatsink/fan) wasn't correctly installed on the CPU."

I would say...

Before eating, always take a little time to thank the food.


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#3
October 30, 2006 at 11:47:12

The comp was bought directly from a local reputable dealer. The comp was never opened (case) until a week ago, when no work was done at the mb or cpu, I only put a different hd. The comp was used intensivelly for the past year (it was bought on June 2005), w/o no problems whatsoever until last Friday. Since the last post, I cleaned the cpu cooler, cleaned the dust which I found in the CPU area. Afterwards, no change obtained: the computer died after 10 minutes. Odd things: the instant shutdown occures now at 65 Celsius. I noticed that the HD temp went up from 35 to 45 in 10 minutes, and that the 12 Volt input increased till 12,54 from 12,2. If this board is about linguistics (for instance, what "brand new" means), please let me know. I think that we are supposed to talk about solutions. Tks.


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Related Solutions

#4
October 30, 2006 at 12:12:58

take of the heat sink and clean all the cpu thermal paste of, and reaply with your prefernce of grease/paste and reaply making sure all the clips are tight dependant on the socket type 478 or 775 which have to different restraint methods
if this does not improve the temps the matter may have to be looked in deeper
good luck and the hdd and 12v changing is nothing
good lukc
Damian

Pentium4 3.20ghz@ 3.7ghz
1Gb Corsair XMS PC3200CL2
1 X 80GB HDD OS
2 x 250gb
NVDIA GeForce4 MX4000
ASUS P4-U800-X
600w PSU 12v 1-14amp
2-15amp
Win Xp


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#5
October 30, 2006 at 18:14:30

"If this board is about linguistics (for instance, what "brand new" means), please let me know"

No, the forum isn't about "linguistics", but "brand new" & over a year old are two completely different things. And since you said it was "brand new", I made the assumption that the CPU was recently installed & the overheating *might* be the result of an improperly installed HSF. Had you been more clear to begin with, we could be concentrating on what may be the cause of your problem rather than debating what "brand new" means.

Also, in your OP, you neglected to mentioned that you recently "put a different hd".

It seems to me that since the "comp was never opened (case) until a week ago" & was "used intensivelly for the past year (it was bought on June 2005), w/o no problems" prior to being opened, that the problem is probably related to the installation of the "different hd"...don't you think?

Now how about providing details about the HDD installation. Is the drive "brand new"? What is it being used for...storage or the operating system? If it's a storage drive, was it put on the primary or 2ndary channel? Was it installed in such a way that it might create excess heat within the case (i.e. too close to the existing HDD)? Is it possible that you inadvertently disturbed the CPU's HSF when you installed the HDD?

I suggest you take 02coled's advice...remove the HSF, thoroughly clean the old paste/pad from the top of the CPU & the bottom of the heatsink, apply a fresh layer of paste, & reinstall it.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/ins_rou...


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#6
October 31, 2006 at 07:44:15

You might want to be sure that the fan on the heatsink is spinning.


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#7
October 31, 2006 at 12:40:38

Late news: you guys know that ATX +12 power connector on the mb. The connector which comes from the source is half burned (one camera completelly melted, another medium burnt, the other two no damage). The ATX on the mb has one camera damaged, the others look clear. I did not try to put, yet, a different power source on the comp and subsequently see if the ATX on the mb is still functional. I will leave this for tommorow, after Barcelona-Chelsea.

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#8
October 31, 2006 at 14:41:25

It could be that the PSU is stuffed and overvolting the CPU.. "on the mb has one camera damaged" do you mean connector? heh. Definately try the computer with a different PSU, running it with a damaged/dying one can destroy your computer and it may have already damaged your computer.

Mattwizz3 : )

Sempron 2600+ @ 2.2GHz
1Gb DDR400
Asus A7N8X-E Deluxe
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2X 80Gb IDE
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